NASA saw Henriette fading and two struggling lows behind

Aug 12, 2013 by Hal Pierce And Rob Gutro
On Aug. 6, towering thunderstorms in Henriette's forming eye reached almost 16.75km (~10.41 miles). In contrast, TRMM PR data on Aug. 9 showed thunderstorms near Henriette's center dropped to less than 12km (~7.5 miles). Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

Once a hurricane, Henriette weakened to a depression in the Central Pacific Ocean on Sunday, Aug. 11 and dissipated by Aug. 12 as two other low pressure areas continued to struggle. NASA's TRMM satellite noticed that Henriette's weakening trend began on Aug. 8.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew over Henriette again on August 9, 2013 at 0122 UTC (~ 4 p.m. local time). During a TRMM orbit overpass on August 8, 2013 at 1709 UTC. (1:09 a.m. EDT), Henriette's eye that was visible but disappeared from view on Aug. 9.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. 3-D images were created showing TRMM data on Aug. 6 and Aug. 9 using Precipitation Radar (PR) data. On Aug. 6 rain was falling at a rate of over 161mm (~6.3 inches) per hour near the center of the hurricane and the tremendous amount of energy being released by towering thunderstorms in Henriette's forming eye was evident with tops reaching almost 16.75 km (~10.41 miles). In contrast, TRMM PR data from Aug. 9 showed thunderstorms near Henriette's center were found to reach heights of less than 12 km (~7.5 miles) indicating the storm had weakened. Henriette dissipated south of Hawaii early on Aug. 12.

On Monday, Aug. 12, two areas of low pressure are being watched for possible development in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. They are located east of where Henriette dissipated are referred to as System 93E and System 92E.

The elongated area of low pressure or trough called System 93E is about 1,300 miles east-southeast of Hawaii near 13 north and 136 west. It is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms and it is moving westward at 10 to 15 mph. This system has a low chance, just 10 percent, of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next two days.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this image of Henriette dissipating, and Systems 93E and 92E at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 11. Credit: NASA's GOES Project

Farthest east is low pressure System 92E, near 13.2north and 123.6 west, about 1,125 miles southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. That low is also producing disorganized showers and , but has a slightly better chance of developing first. The National Hurricane Center gives System 92E a 20 percent chance for becoming a tropical depression in the next 2 days.

Explore further: New, tighter timeline confirms ancient volcanism aligned with dinosaurs' extinction

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA paints a panorama of Pacific tropical cyclones

Aug 09, 2013

The Central and Eastern Pacific Oceans continue to be active on Aug. 9, as Hurricane Henriette weakens and two other low pressure systems continue developing. All three systems were captured on the one panoramic ...

NASA sees Hurricane Gil being chased by developing storm

Aug 02, 2013

On July 31, NASA's TRMM satellite saw Tropical Storm Gil intensifying and the storm became a hurricane. NASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured views of Gil on Aug. 1 as it was being chased ...

Recommended for you

Scientists make strides in tsunami warning since 2004

9 hours ago

The 2004 tsunami led to greater global cooperation and improved techniques for detecting waves that could reach faraway shores, even though scientists still cannot predict when an earthquake will strike.

Trade winds ventilate the tropical oceans

9 hours ago

Long-term observations indicate that the oxygen minimum zones in the tropical oceans have expanded in recent decades. The reason is still unknown. Now scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.