Instagram, other sites go down

Aug 26, 2013

Amazon's unit that runs Web servers for other companies had problems Sunday that coincided with outages or slowdowns on several popular websites.

AirBnB says its site was one of those affected. Other services that were slow or unavailable included Instagram and Twitter's Vine video-sharing application.

Online home rental service AirBnB tweeted at 4:32 p.m. ET that it was one of several websites and apps that were temporarily down because Amazon server problems.

Instagram sent a saying it was aware some users were having trouble loading Instagram and that was working on the problem. Vine later sent a similar tweet.

Amazon Web Services provides companies with online storage and . Its website showed several problems resolved on Sunday evening, with a few remaining.

Amazon did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Explore further: Microsoft says under antitrust probe in China

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