Google's ADM phone finder coming this month

Aug 05, 2013 by Nancy Owano weblog
Google’s ADM phone finder coming this month

Android Device Manager will be available later this month for phones with Android 2.2 or later. The official Android blog carried the announcement last week in a posting by Android product manager, Benjamin Poiesz. The service will enable Android users to enjoy the same protective features that iPhone users enjoy with Apple's Find my iPhone and that assorted third-party services offer those who have Android smartphones.

Lookout for Android, for example, has been a popular option thus far. The Lookout service carries a Lock It Down feature, where, If your device is in the wrong place at the wrong time, you remotely lock it to block access to your personal data. You can post a custom message to get it back, and there is the Wipe It Clean option to wipe data off the device if the user thinks the device is gone for good.

You will not find any shortage of 'Find My Phone' services available. As for Apple, the Find my iPhone was announced back in 2010 as a software app to help pinpoint the exact location of an iOS device.

Basically, the ADM phone finder covers all possible scenarios, for times when you accidentally drop your phone into a bag, or park it somewhere in the room where you cannot remember and need to hear it ring to locate the sound. What is nice about Android Device Manager is that even if your phone was in Silent mode the ADM will ring your phone at maximum volume. The second scenario is when you have forgotten your phone at some more remote location. The service will let you check its whereabouts on a map, If both scenarios don't fit, and the phone is stolen, you have the option to wipe everything off the phone, erasing all data.

Android Device Manager will be downloadable. Google says that you will need to be signed in to your Google account to use it. Several Android watching sites over the weekend, meanwhile, reported that the first stage of the ADM is being pushed out to a few users even though the service is not yet live. These users reported that the service was rolled out to their devices already.

While it has taken Google some time to come out with its own find-phone solution, it can never be too late. Mobile security company Lookout viewed data last year and estimated that lost phones, if unrecovered, could cost U.S. consumers billions, They said at the time that "Losing your phone is more than just a hassle – it's expensive. If everyone who misplaced their phone didn't ever recover it, we estimate lost phones could cost U.S. consumers more than $30 billion in 2012."

Coffee shops, offices, bars and restaurants top the list as the most common venues to lose a phone in the U.S. The top U.S. city for lost phones is Philadelphia, and the most likely venue for losing a phone is a coffee shop. In London, they said, the top venue to lose a phone was a pub.

Explore further: SHORE facial analysis spots emotions on Google Glass

More information: officialandroid.blogspot.com/2… ne-with-android.html

Related Stories

QR code security vulnerability found with Google Glass

Jul 18, 2013

Engineers at Lookout Mobile Security have discovered a previously unknown security vulnerability with Google's project Glass wearable headset. Marc Rogers reports on the company's web site that engineers found that when pictures were taken of pri ...

Google rolls its own keyboard app for Android 4.0 and up

Jun 06, 2013

(Phys.org) —Google Maps, Google Drive, Google This, Google That….But there is always room for one more new arrival from Google, and now it is in the form of an app called Google Keyboard. Available at ...

Facebook barges into Google turf with Home

Apr 05, 2013

Facebook Home, the new application that takes over the front screen of a smartphone, is a bit of a corporate home invasion. Facebook is essentially moving into Google's turf, taking advantage of software the s ...

Recommended for you

SHORE facial analysis spots emotions on Google Glass

12 hours ago

One of the key concerns about facial recognition software has been over privacy. The very idea of having tracking mechanisms as part of an Internet-connected wearable would be likely to upset many privacy ...

Does your computer know how you're feeling?

Aug 22, 2014

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users' emotional states as much as 87% of the time, depending on the emotion.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Neurons_At_Work
not rated yet Aug 06, 2013
You know, I think this is great news, and better late than never. I have no interest in getting into a pissing contest over the accepted fact that other platforms have had this for years, nor do I care that the service is available via numerous other apps. I myself have been using Cerberus for Android since I bought my tablet, and it works very well. Still, an application produced by the same group that developed the OS is preferable and likely more stable, and I can't wait to try it out. (I do hope it isn't just for 'phones', though. I'd be just as butt hurt as anyone if I got up and left my Nexus at the Barnes and Nobel cafe.)