Ex-Tropical Storm Utor still raining on southern China

Aug 15, 2013 by Rob Gutro
NASA's Terra satellite passed over China at 03:25 UTC on Aug. 15 (11:25 p.m. EDT) and captured this visible image that showed Utor still has an obvious circulation. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

NASA satellite data revealed that the day after Typhoon Utor made landfall in southern China, its circulation still appeared intact despite weakening over land.

Typhoon Utor's eye made landfall around 0730 UTC/3:30 a.m. EDT on Aug. 14. On Aug. 15, Utor was still dropping rain over southern China.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over China at 03:25 UTC on Aug. 15 (11:25 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible image of Utor. The MODIS image showed Utor still had a circulation, despite weakening to a low pressure area.

On Aug. 15, Utor was raining over the western part of the Guandong Province, the eastern part of the Guangxi Province and southern part of the Hunan Province. Despite areas of moderate rainfall, all warnings had been dropped by the China Meteorological Administration on Aug. 15.

Aljazeera News reported that Utor was responsible for the death of one person and five people were still missing as of Aug. 15. Utor was the twelfth tropical cyclone to hit China in 2013.

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