Drone delivers beer not bombs at S.Africa music festival

Aug 08, 2013
Revellers at a South African outdoor rock festival no longer need to queue to slake their thirst—a flying robot will drop them beer by parachute.

Revellers at a South African outdoor rock festival no longer need to queue to slake their thirst—a flying robot will drop them beer by parachute.

After clients place an order using a smartphone app, a drone zooms 15 metres (50 feet) above the heads of the festival-goers to make the delivery.

Carel Hoffmann, director of the Oppikoppi festival held on a dusty farm in the country's northern Limpopo province, said the app registers the position of users using the GPS satellite chips on their phones.

"The delivery guys have a calibrated delivery drone. They send it to the GPS position and drops it with a ," he explained.

The drone was built in South Africa and nicknamed "Manna" after the Old Testament-story of bread that fell from the sky to feed the Israelites travelling through the desert following their exodus from Egypt.

"It's an almost Biblical thing that beer is dropping from the sky," said Hoffmann.

The beer, free at this stage, is dropped in plastic cups and the is performing well.

"Every time it drops a parachute a crowd of 5,000 cheers," he said.

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Jeweller
not rated yet Aug 08, 2013
Here in Cape Town, South Africa last Sunday my 11yr old nephew showed me an aerial video he took with his drone/quad copter of his local neighbourhood. He either did it with his i phone or i pad, I'm not sure and showed it to me on a laptop.
My neighbour's child who is 10yrs old also has these things.
I find it absolutely amazing what youngsters have as toys now days.
It's wonderful.