DC zoo: Panda behavior hints at possible pregnancy

Aug 06, 2013

The Smithsonian's National Zoo says its female giant panda is showing behavioral changes and is focused on building her nest as animal keepers watch for a possible pregnancy.

On Tuesday, the zoo said Mei Xiang (may-SHONG) is spending most of time inside sleeping. The zoo says that's normal toward the end of a pregnancy or a false pregnancy in which her hormone levels rise.

The zoo says Mei Xiang is also sensitive to noise and has been focused on building her nest since early July. Last week, the zoo closed part of its panda house around her den to give her a quiet space.

A Chinese panda expert performed artificial inseminations on Mei Xiang on March 30 after she failed to breed naturally with male panda Tian Tian (tee-YEN tee-YEN).

Explore further: Secrets of how worms wriggle uncovered

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

National Zoo keeping watch for panda pregnancy

Jul 26, 2013

(AP)—Scientists at the Smithsonian's National Zoo say the female giant panda's hormones are rising, which indicates she may be pregnant or experiencing a false pregnancy.

Pandas mate with help at the National Zoo

Mar 24, 2008

U.S. veterinarians have artificially inseminated Mei Xiang, a female giant panda at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, after natural mating was unsuccessful.

US zoo cites liver disease in baby panda's death

Oct 11, 2012

Veterinary pathologists on Thursday blamed liver disease brought on by insufficient oxygen for the sudden death of a six-day-old baby panda born at the National Zoo in Washington last month.

Recommended for you

New research reveals clock ticking for fruit flies

45 minutes ago

The army of pesky Queensland fruit flies that annually inflict many millions of dollars-worth of damage on the nation's horticultural industry may be about to see their numbers take a significant dive thanks ...

The ABC's of animal speech: Not so random after all

2 hours ago

The calls of many animals, from whales to wolves, might contain more language-like structure than previously thought, according to study that raises new questions about the evolutionary origins of human language.

User comments : 0