Rate of temperature change along world's coastlines has itself changed dramatically over the past three decades

Jul 01, 2013
Route 1, Monterrey Coastline; credit Dr. Hannas Baumann.

Locally, changes in coastal ocean temperatures may be much more extreme than global averages imply. New research published in the June 18 edition of PLoS ONE entitled "Decadal Changes in the World's Coastal Latitudinal Temperature Gradients," is highlighting some of the distinct regional implications associated with global climate-change. By looking at changes in coastal ocean temperatures over the past 30 years, Dr. Hannes Baumann in the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) and Dr. Owen Doherty of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SoMAS alumnus) mapped the differences in how the world's coastlines are experiencing climate change, and discuss the possible large scale ecological implications of this.

Their results showed a great regional diversity in warming and cooling patterns. For example, the South American Pacific coasts have been cooling over the last few decades. To some, these cooling trends may be counterintuitive, but they are consistent with predictions, such as increases in upwelling (i.e., a process that brings cold, deep ocean water to the coast).

In the North Pacific and North Atlantic, however, there has been warming trend. In some areas, the authors detected changes in temperature of +/-2.5 degrees Celsius, which is 3 times higher than the global average. Climate change is happening everywhere – just not necessarily at the same rate, or even in the same direction." For example, if you live on Cape Cod, your conditions are warming three times faster than global averages imply, while in Santiago, Chile, coastal waters have been getting cooler.

"The world is getting flatter," said Baumann. "Coastal waters at high (cold) latitudes warm much faster than at low (warm) latitudes, hence the majority of the world's coastal temperature gradients are getting shallower. This could cause dramatic reorganization of organisms and ecosystems, from small plankton communities to larger fish populations.

"We already know, in general, that marine life changes in its characteristics along these North-South temperature gradients," Baumann explains. "For example, many coastal fish populations differ genetically from north to south, an adaptation to grow best a local temperature conditions. With further study, we want to explore how changes in coastal ocean temperature gradients could predict large-scale changes in the ecosystem."

Baumann and Doherty's work is especially poignant in that it echoes the importance of regional and community resiliency in dealing with the effects of climate change, which was stressed in President Obama's address earlier this week. Regional consequences of climate change may be quite different. This study steps away from global average temperature predictions, and puts in a more meaningful regional context.

Explore further: NASA's HS3 mission spotlight: The HIRAD instrument

More information: Baumann, H. and Doherty, O. (2013) Decadal Changes in the World's Coastal Latitudinal Temperature Gradients. PLoS ONE 8(6): e67596. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0067596

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NikFromNYC
2.1 / 5 (25) Jul 01, 2013
Climate always changes. Science is not about labeling things as consistent with theory but instead involves a vigorous search for specific data streams that do not fit with predictions of existing theory and since climatology utterly fails to do this its claim to being a science is laughable. Those who studied our planet by actually visiting our moon, *all* agree:

http://a2.img.mob...arge.jpg
VendicarE
3.7 / 5 (22) Jul 01, 2013
People always die, so according to the Logic of NikkieTard from NY, there is no such thing as murder.

"Science is not about labeling things as consistent with theory..." - NikkieTard

Actually, doing so is the primary occupation of Scientists, as they seek to overturn or add nuance to existing scientific theory.

When someone like NikkieTard makes two flagrant errors in the first two sentences of a paragraph, you know that there is no point in reading any of the mindless tripe that follows.
NikFromNYC
1.9 / 5 (22) Jul 01, 2013
"For example, if you live on Cape Cod, your conditions are warming three times faster than global averages imply...."

Wolfram Alpha to our rescue. Cape Cod is next to Boston which has a real thermometer record that shows utterly no trend up or down since this chart begins in the 1940s so I guess "Global Warming" forgot about us, East Coast, despite all the technically involved scare claims such as the one I just quoted.

http://www.wolfra...f+boston

There's a pop-up menu to plot All data.

The center of Massachusetts has been cooling since the 1940s:

http://www.wolfra...chusetts

Keywords: cock-and-bull, hooey, snow job, flimflam, racket
NikFromNYC
1.9 / 5 (23) Jul 01, 2013
DON'T READ THIS!!!

"There is one feature I notice that is generally missing in "cargo cult science." It's a kind of scientific integrity, a principle of scientific thought that corresponds to a kind of utter honesty — a kind of leaning over backwards. For example, if you're doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid — not only what you think is right about it; other causes that could possibly explain your results; and things you thought of that you've eliminated by some other experiment, and how they worked — to make sure the other fellow can tell they have been eliminated. Details that could throw doubt on your interpretation must be given, if you know them. You must do the best you can — if you know anything at all wrong, or possibly wrong — to explain it. If you make a theory, for example, and advertise it, or put it out, then you must also put down all the facts that disagree with it, as well as those that agree with it." - Feynman
antialias_physorg
3.9 / 5 (21) Jul 01, 2013
Nik:
This is about the rate of change (i.e. the second derivative).
You're arguing about climate change (first derivative) - so I guess you haven't understood the article at all.
NikFromNYC
1.8 / 5 (24) Jul 01, 2013
Nik: This is about the rate of change (i.e. the second derivative)....


Such smug obfuscation helps me when I'm feeling activist here with my trusty iPhone as I procrastinate on my latest tetrahedral 3D mathematical morphing of source objects onto curved surfaces with their size varying according to relief height but placement is controlled by dynamic circle packing, all within the Grasshopper parametric programming system that runs in Rhino so I can then cut these designs out with eight sided angled indexing using a CNC machine here in my Manhattan fabrication studio. It helps me since it provides a natural excuse to post more factual info-graphics that were I to just post as a big list would trigger layperson aversion since it just looks like AstroTurf link bombing. So normally I'd post thermometer and tide gauge records here, but today I'm being meta activist instead.
Maggnus
3.7 / 5 (19) Jul 01, 2013
Your misunderstandings of your own postings, your misrepresentations of quoted material and your denialist agenda are all so profoundly obvious as to make your postings an exercise in the teaching of the denialist mindset to students studying psychotic disconnect with reality.

Clearly you are spending too much time locked in your room. It is resulting in your readily apparent social awkwardness combined with your inability to understand the meaning of articles you read.

You are not being meta-activist you are being derisively denialist.
VendicarE
3.7 / 5 (19) Jul 01, 2013
"Such smug obfuscation helps me..." - NikkieTard

Why didn't it help you distinguish between a value and it's rate of change?

You poor Tardie Boy.
NOM
4.3 / 5 (16) Jul 01, 2013
NikFromNYC
DON'T READ THIS!!!

After reading one of your posts, this disclaimer is redundant.
deepsand
3.1 / 5 (17) Jul 02, 2013
Such smug obfuscation helps me when I'm feeling activist here with my trusty iPhone as I procrastinate on my latest tetrahedral 3D mathematical morphing of source objects onto curved surfaces with their size varying according to relief height but placement is controlled by dynamic circle packing, all within the Grasshopper parametric programming system that runs in Rhino so I can then cut these designs out with eight sided angled indexing using a CNC machine here in my Manhattan fabrication studio. It helps me since it provides a natural excuse to post more factual info-graphics that were I to just post as a big list would trigger layperson aversion since it just looks like AstroTurf link bombing. So normally I'd post thermometer and tide gauge records here, but today I'm being meta activist instead.

You lack the humour to be entertaining, the knowledge to be informative, and have all the charm and attraction of a deceased rat which suffered from leprosy and incontinence.
VENDItardE
1.4 / 5 (18) Jul 02, 2013
more absolute and total BS
VendicarE
4.3 / 5 (11) Jul 02, 2013
VendiTardE can't do science.

It makes his brain cell hurt.
deepsand
3 / 5 (14) Jul 03, 2013
more absolute and total BS

One wearies of your constant pecking at one aspect of a subject like an insane woodpecker looking for a grub in a block of concrete.
Neinsense99
3.2 / 5 (9) Jul 07, 2013
more absolute and total BS

That just just oozes open-minded evaluation of evidence, doesn't it?
Neinsense99
3.2 / 5 (9) Jul 07, 2013
Climate always changes. Science is not about labeling things as consistent with theory but instead involves a vigorous search for specific data streams that do not fit with predictions of existing theory and since climatology utterly fails to do this its claim to being a science is laughable. Those who studied our planet by actually visiting our moon, *all* agree:

http://a2.img.mob...arge.jpg


Climate change deniers using dirty tricks from 'tobacco wars'
http://phys.org/n...l#ajTabs