First rifle constructed from printed 3D parts by gun enthusiast in Canada (w/ Video)

Jul 26, 2013 by Bob Yirka report

A man known as "ThreeD Ukulele" on YouTube has posted a video that shows him (or a colleague) test firing a small rifle (named the "Grizzly" after a Canadian tank) that he claims was constructed by parts he printed on a 3D printer. If his claims turn out to be true, it will mark the first known instance of a rifle being constructed in such a way.

In the video, a man can be seen affixing the barrel to the rifle (which appears to be made of a white plastic) then exiting off-screen to fire the rifle from a safe distance via string tied to the trigger. The man then returns to view after the shot has been fired to inspect the condition of the rifle. He reports that the .22 caliber bullet fired successfully but a portion of the barrel split as did the receiver.

Printing guns using expensive 3D printers has been in the news of late after a man who goes by the name Cody Wilson created blueprints for printing a handgun which he claimed he had personally test-fired. Since private citizens are not allowed to own such weapons in Canada, ThreeD Ukulele (aka CanadianGunNut on the DEFCAD forums) modified the blueprints for the "Liberator"—the name Wilson gave to his printed gun. Small arms rifles are allowed for hunting of small game in Canada, so CanadianGunNut added a longer barrel. He's one of the lucky few that have access to a 3D printer—a Stratasys Dimension 1200es where he works and is allowed to pursue personal projects as well.

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Thus far, as can be seen in demonstration videos, guns produced by 3D printers aren't nearly of the same quality as those produced by professional arms makers—the printed rifle in the video, for example, isn't much better than one made from a copper tube and fired by striking with a hammer. What appears to be the reason for concern, of course, is what the future may hold. Higher quality guns printed by ordinary citizens would not only be untraceable, they could be made of materials that could easily pass through metal detectors at airports and other public venues. Worse perhaps, might be the government's inability to stop the process—laws enacted to prevent the creation, distribution or downloading of blueprints would be exceeding difficult to enforce as would preventing the printing of the product at a private location.

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Sanescience
2.3 / 5 (6) Jul 26, 2013
Now there is somebody who wants attention.

"What appears to be the reason for concern, of course, is what the future may hold. Higher quality guns printed by ordinary citizens would not only be untraceable..."

Um, that has not only been going on for decades, but is legal via Gun Control Act of 1968. It reads, "an unlicensed individual may make a firearm," it does also says it has to be for personal use and cannot be for sale or distribution.

"...they could be made of materials that could easily pass through metal detectors at airports and other public venues."

Um, that has been going on in prisons across America since forever. Single use guns can be made of wood.

Yet none of this stuff comes up because... they want to stoke fear and get your attention!

indio007
2.3 / 5 (6) Jul 26, 2013
The government can only control commerce.Even Drug laws are actually tax laws.
It is perfectly legal to create your own firearm and do whatever.
You don't need a permit/license/permission.
There is always the legal presumption that the firearm was purchased. That's no longer true when the owner is the manufacturer.
Eikka
4 / 5 (4) Jul 26, 2013
Higher quality guns printed by ordinary citizens would not only be untraceable, they could be made of materials that could easily pass through metal detectors at airports and other public venues.


Seeing that there exists no known material that is non-metallic, non conductive, and rigid and tough enough to serve as a gun barrel - yet melts or sinters readily to be 3D printable - the concern about people printing their own non-detectable weapons is completely unfounded.

3D printers still have trouble producing solid metal parts that beat cast iron in mechanical properties.
zorro6204
2.6 / 5 (5) Jul 26, 2013
Just pure silliness, something to get the libs all excited and jumping around. A plastic gun that's split by a .22 cartridge, ooh, we're all in danger now! Jesus, you could do more damage hitting someone with the "gun".
VendicarE
3 / 5 (2) Jul 26, 2013
Looks like a board with a nail in it would do a better job.

Neinsense99
3 / 5 (6) Jul 27, 2013
Why do people quote

Now there is somebody who wants attention.

"What appears to be the reason for concern, of course, is what the future may hold. Higher quality guns printed by ordinary citizens would not only be untraceable..."

Um, that has not only been going on for decades, but is legal via Gun Control Act of 1968. It reads, "an unlicensed individual may make a firearm," it does also says it has to be for personal use and cannot be for sale or distribution.

"...they could be made of materials that could easily pass through metal detectors at airports and other public venues."

Um, that has been going on in prisons across America since forever. Single use guns can be made of wood.

Yet none of this stuff comes up because... they want to stoke fear and get your attention!


It even says Canada in the headline, but you quote US legislation anyway.
PoppaJ
1.7 / 5 (6) Jul 27, 2013
This article is very dangerous. It is implying a concern about this. The barrel and housing broke. That means it is not effective and is more dangerous to the shooter since the energy from the .22 is consumed by the destruction of the gun. It is not a successful weapon. It is actually less dangerous to the target than a person with a metal pipe bought from a hardware store and a rubber band with a nail on it to make a zip gun. I have a replicator. There is no way in this world you can use the plastic from one of those to actually make a truly workable firearm. YOU CANNOT USE THE TYPE OF MATERIAL NEEDED TO MAKE A FIRE ARM IN ONE OF THESE PUBLICLY AVAILABLE REPLICATORS. THE EXTRUDER CANNOT PRODUCE THE HEAT NEEDED. The machines that can are so expensive that successfully replicating weapons will only be available to manufacturers. Want an example. Go out into your garage and try to make a car. These articles will only serve to generate fear and movements against a great technology
Dug
5 / 5 (1) Jul 27, 2013
Anyone with basic shop and or gunsmithing skills can go to the local hardware store and buy all that they need to build an effective firearm (for far less than the cost of a 3-D printer) - that will shoot factory ammunition or black powder. The concern over 3-D printing of firearms is simply a demonstration of extraordinary ignorance regarding the limitations of 3-D printing, guns in general, and their relative risks - especially of those in the media that post these kinds of articles.
dtxx
2.3 / 5 (3) Jul 27, 2013
.22 is a poor choice for a printed gun because it generates high chamber pressures (22,000 cup) despite its reputation for mild recoil. A .38 special would only generate 2/3 as much pressure (14,000 cup) and put a lot more energy downrange.

Also, why does no one realize that for about the same investment as a 3d printer you could get a CNC machining set up and some training. Then you could make as many machineguns as you wanted out of real metal that can use military style 30 round magazines. Why is that not getting any attention?

And why the need to regulate so heavily on the means of production? Why not punish people for the bad thing they do with the printed gun instead of creating even more laws?
ink boy
2 / 5 (4) Jul 28, 2013
"they could be made of materials that could easily pass through metal detectors at airports and other public venues."

Bullets are still made of metal though.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Jul 28, 2013
Anyone with basic shop and or gunsmithing skills can go to the local hardware store

The point of 3D printing is then that you don't even need these basic skills anymore (as well as avoiding shopowners or online stores from registering that you bought parts that can be used to make a gun...which is something that law enforcement looks at after a crime with homemade firearms has been comitted)

YOU CANNOT USE THE TYPE OF MATERIAL NEEDED TO MAKE A FIRE ARM IN ONE OF THESE PUBLICLY AVAILABLE REPLICATORS

There's plenty available replicators that can print metal. These are, however, expensive. But if someone is really serious about a firearm not being traceable then printers are an option in the near future.
I give it a year or two until someone prints a GOOD/workeable all-plastic gun.

Bullets are still made of metal though.

If the barrel can be made of plastic then there's no reason bullets can't, also.
TheKnowItAll
1 / 5 (1) Jul 28, 2013
Fear as always been a very effective tool in gaining control. The real fear though is that people will be able to print their own toys and avoid taxation. The goal is to easily justify the control and heavy taxation on these plastics. I bet you as soon as the printers become affordable to the common user the required plastics will become horribly taxed.
Sanescience
1 / 5 (1) Jul 29, 2013
Why do people quote
Now there is somebody who wants attention.

It even says Canada in the headline, but you quote US legislation anyway.


Yea, because the internet totally obeys political boarders.

3D printers still have trouble producing solid metal parts that beat cast iron in mechanical properties.


Um, 3d printing is in use in aerospace applications I would imagine outperforms cast iron.

"Models made in titanium are printed in titanium powder that is sintered together by a laser to produce end-use metal parts that are as equally good as machined models"

http://i.materialise.com/materials/titanium

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