Panasonic starts first mass production of ReRAM mounted microcomputers

Jul 30, 2013
Panasonic starts first mass production of ReRAM mounted microcomputers

Panasonic Corporation today announced that it will start the world's first mass-production of microcomputers with mounted ReRAM, a type of non-volatile memory, in August 2013. Through utilizing microcomputers with mounted ReRAM, it will be possible to achieve high-speed rewriting and longer operational times in battery-powered equipment, such as portable devices and security devices etc., reducing the amount of maintenance required. The first of these mass-produced products is the low power consumption 8-bit microcomputer, MN101LR series.

In recent years, battery-driven equipment, such as portable healthcare products and security equipment for disaster and crime prevention, is becoming more common. There is a growing requirement to decrease the maintenance time for such equipment by reducing the frequency of battery replacements through extending the battery operation time. In addition, due to the high performance of the equipment, there is a need to read and write information in memory at high speed. In order to respond to such requirements, the company has introduced a microcomputer series with mounted ReRAM, featuring low power consumption and high-speed rewriting. The first part of the series comes in 16 models which feature a wide variety of peripheral functions, such as built-in LCD display control, high precision 12-bit AD converter, clock function, etc. Panasonic plans to expand the field of applications of ReRAM microcomputers to other applications, including non-contact IC cards such as electronic passports, wearable equipment connected to the cloud, and energy harvesting related products.

This development has the following features:

- The use of the newly developed 0.18 ┬Ám ReRAM in microcomputers and low power-consumption processes contributes to longer operational times for customers' products.
- The high-speed, low by byte rewriting can easily reduce the amount of EEPROM [3] previously required as part of an external attachment, thereby reducing the system cost.
- The ReRAM to be produced this time around is based on the rewriting principle of a redox reaction of a metal oxide, in which high-speed rewriting and high reliability can be achieved, making it ideal for industrial applications.

The product will be suitable for applications in portable healthcare products, such as blood-pressure meters and physical activity meters, security equipment, such as fire alarms, eco-management sensing , and non-contact IC cards, such as electronic passports, etc.

Explore further: Renesas announces SRAM using leading-edge 16 nm FinFET for automotive information systems

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Elpida Memory develops resistance RAM prototype

Jan 24, 2012

Elpida Memory, the world's third largest Dynamic Random Access Memory ("DRAM") manufacturer, today announced the development of its first-ever high-speed non-volatile resistance memory (ReRAM) prototype. As the ReRAM prototype ...

New 1 Mbit and 2 Mbit FRAM products released by Fujitsu

Mar 18, 2013

Fujitsu Semiconductor today announced the development of two new FRAM products, MB85RS1MT and MB85RS2MT, which feature 1 Mbit and 2 Mbit of memory, respectively, making them the largest density serial-interface ...

Recommended for you

Impoverished North Korea falls back on cyber weapons

9 hours ago

As one of the world's most impoverished powers, North Korea would struggle to match America's military or economic might, but appears to have settled on a relatively cheap method to torment its foe.

Five ways to make your email safer in case of a hack attack

9 hours ago

The Sony hack, the latest in a wave of company security breaches, exposed months of employee emails. Other hacks have given attackers access to sensitive information about a company and its customers, such as credit-card ...

2012 movie massacre hung over 'Interview' decision

10 hours ago

When a group claiming credit for the hacking of Sony Pictures Entertainment threated violence against theaters showing "The Interview" earlier this week, the fate of the movie's big-screen life was all but ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.