OU physicists develop rationale for the next-generation particle collider

Jul 02, 2013

A University of Oklahoma-developed theory provides the rationale for the next-generation particle accelerator—the International Linear Collider. The discovery of the Higgs boson at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in Geneva Switzerland this past year prompted particle physicists to look ahead to the development of the ILC, an electron-positron collider designed to measure in detail all the properties of the newly discovered Higgs particle.

Howard Baer, professor in the OU Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, was one of the lead authors of the five-volume ILC Technical Design Report published on June 12. The report, which presents the latest and most technologically advanced blueprint for construction of the ILC, was celebrated recently by the global particle physics community in three consecutive events in Asia, Europe and the Americas.

The OU physicist has spent much of his career developing the theory of supersymmetry or SUSY—a theory which advances particle physics beyond the Higgs boson into new and unexplored territory. SUSY provides one of the major motivations for constructing a next-generation particle collider such as the ILC to complement and advance the discovery capabilities of the LHC at CERN.

The ILC will allow to study the Higgs particle with much higher precision than is possible at the LHC. However, Baer along with postdocs and students at OU have proposed the theory "radiatively-driven natural supersymmetry," which predicts that new partner particles of the Higgs known as higgsinos should be produced at the ILC. The properties of higgsinos are such that they may effectively be invisible to searches at LHC.

Baer has developed computer code over a 25-year period to calculate super particle masses and production rates for the LHC in CERN. The ILC would be a precision microscope for studying subatomic matter at a deeper level than is possible at LHC.

Moving the project forward will require the support of Asia, Europe and the United States. The total cost for the ILC is estimated at around $10 billion and will take approximately 10 years to build. A location has not been determined for the ILC, but the Japanese government has expressed enthusiasm to act as host country and pay the bulk of the cost provided that additional support can be received from the international community, according to Barry Barish, director of the ILC's Global Design Effort.

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More information: For more information about the ILC Technical Design Report, see arXiv.org/abs/arXiv:1306.6352

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vacuum-mechanics
1 / 5 (4) Jul 02, 2013
Moving the project forward will require the support of Asia, Europe and the United States. The total cost for the ILC is estimated at around $10 billion and will take approximately 10 years to build. A location has not been determined for the ILC, but the Japanese government has expressed enthusiasm to act as host country and pay the bulk of the cost provided that additional support can be received from the international community, according to Barry Barish, director of the ILC's Global Design Effort.

This seems to be a huge cost project which has to consider carefully in nowadays' global economy crisis situation, anyway maybe this cheaper, simple and understandable thinking solution could help …
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maxb500_live_nl
1 / 5 (2) Jul 02, 2013
The ILC is a waste of time and epic amounts of money.

The CLIC is the only next generation linear collider. It has far better potential for far more results. ILC is just a greatly inferior device to CLIC. It`s probably because CLIC is mostly supported by collaboration of Europeans (especially Germans) while ILC is mostly supported by Americans. They have been working on ILC for years. They don`t want another loss of support after the failure of the Superconducting Super Collider. Even if that means their design will not be build in the US. Since it takes so much money and time to construct a next gen collider it will mean a big fight ahead.

But CERN has already said they want the next generation linear collider build at CERN. And since CERN has by far the worlds largest physics research budget the changes are strong that it will be build at CERN. Why would CERN help to pay over half of a Japanese based collider. Talk about wasting taxes of Europeans. Politicians will not accept.
maxb500_live_nl
1 / 5 (2) Jul 02, 2013
This is like with ITER. A long fight will be ahead.