Key factors for wireless power transfer

July 31, 2013

What happens to a resonant wireless power transfer system in the presence of complex electromagnetic environments, such as metal plates? A team of researchers explored the influences at play in this type of situation, and they describe in the American Institute of Physics' journal AIP Advances how efficient wireless power transfer can indeed be achieved in the presence of metal plates.

The team discovered that matching, alignment of the magnetic field, and impedance matching are the most important factors for efficient wireless power transfer. These findings are highly significant, they say, because one futuristic application of wireless power transfer would be to harness and use it via to charge electric vehicles.

Corresponding coils attached to the bottom of an electric vehicle would pick up energy as the vehicle passes over the coils embedded in the highway. With this type of dynamic charging, an electric vehicle's driving range could become unlimited and the size of its batteries would be greatly reduced.

Wireless power transfer technology may find use in a wide range of applications beyond powering electric vehicles, said Xiaofang Yu, an electrical engineer and postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University who led the research.

Other applications may include charging mobile devices, , or even medical devices implanted in the human body.

Explore further: Apple patents a 1-meter-range wireless charging system

More information: The article "Wireless power transfer in the presence of metallic plates: Experimental Results" by Xiaofang Yu, Torbjorn Skauli, Bjorn Skauli, Sunil Sandhu, Peter B. Catrysse, and Shanhui Fan appears in the journal AIP Advances. dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4809665

Related Stories

Apple patents a 1-meter-range wireless charging system

June 15, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- According to a recently submitted patent application by Apple, wireless charging may be a whole new boost. That patent, which is entitled "Wireless power utilization in a local computing environment" is a ...

Qualcomm's HaloIPT tech brings wireless charging for EVs

January 16, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Qualcomm has demonstrated its new wireless power transmission system for electric vehicles (EVs) at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). The system, including one pad for power transmitting, another for power-receiving, ...

Charging electric vehicles cheaper and faster

April 30, 2013

Researchers at Chalmers have developed a unique integrated motor drive and battery charger for electric vehicles. Compared to today's electric vehicle chargers, they have managed to shorten the charging time from eight to ...

Recommended for you

Software turns smartphones into tools for medical research

July 27, 2015

Jody Kearns doesn't like to spend time obsessing about her Parkinson's disease. The 56-year-old dietitian from Syracuse, New York, had to give up bicycling because the disorder affected her balance. But she still works, drives ...

Where is solar power headed?

July 22, 2015

Most experts agree that to have a shot at curbing the worst impacts of climate change, we need to extricate our society from fossil fuels and ramp up our use of renewable energy.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Thnder
not rated yet Jul 31, 2013
"Corresponding coils attached to the bottom of an electric vehicle would pick up energy as the vehicle passes over the coils embedded in the highway."
Sounds expensive. I could see it in certain areas, but this Country has a crap load of Highways.
Oh and how do you charge people for that? Taxes? Tolls? A meter?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.