Higgs evidence mounts one year on, so too the suspense

Jul 02, 2013 by Laurent Banguet
A picture with a zoom effect show a grafic traces of proton-proton collisions events measured by European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experience, on May 25, 2011. On July 4 last year, physicists announced to rousing applause that they had found an elementary particle "consistent with (the) long-sought Higgs boson"—a scientific milestone.

A year since the discovery of a subatomic particle set the science world aflutter, evidence is mounting it may be the elusive Higgs boson even as researchers warn the suspense is far from over.

"We have established without a doubt that we have a new particle, and that it is a boson. What remains to be done is confirm that it is a Higgs," said physicist Pauline Gagnon, a member of the team that made the discovery at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN).

The elusive boson dubbed the "God Particle" was theorised by British physicist Peter Higgs in 1964 to be what gave mass to matter as the Universe cooled after the Big Bang.

Guided by the theoretical work of Higgs and others, hundreds of scientists have been on a single-minded boson quest for over three years at the CERN's atom-smashing Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

On July 4 last year, physicists announced to rousing applause that they had found an "consistent with (the) long-sought Higgs boson"—a scientific milestone.

Finding the Higgs would fill a massive gap in the Standard Model of particle physics, which describes the forces, particles and interactions that comprise the Universe.

In theory, the Higgs exists as an invisible field, interacting with other particles to give them mass. Without it, humans and all other joined-up atoms in the Universe would not exist.

But while the Standard Model postulates the existence of a single Higgs boson, alternative schools of thought like say there may be at least five.

"Have we found THE boson, or perhaps one of several predicted by other theories ...? Until now, everything indicates that this is the Standard Model boson," Gagnon told AFP.

"It has the allure, the look, the song and the dance of the Higgs boson."

Graphic explanation of the role of the Higgs boson particle

Over the past year, have analysed at least 2.5 times the amount of information they had available at the time of the 2012 announcement.

And they have said the particle now appears to have at least two of the main characteristics expected of a Higgs.

In theory, a Higgs boson should have zero "spin," a measure of momentum. And "parity"—a measure of how its mirror image behaves in quantum physics—should be positive.

Having analysed mountains of data, the CERN said in March the available data pointed to "no spin and positive parity".

"It is all shaping up exactly the way it should. Everything we look at looks more and more like a Higgs boson," said Bill Murray, deputy physics coordinator for the ATLAS experiment at CERN.

"We haven't seen anything that doesn't look at all the way a Higgs boson should. We have some small tensions in the data with one or two pieces that are not exactly the way you would expect... but this is not particularly significant."

Former European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) Director-General Christopher Llewellyn-Smith, CERN scientific director Lyn Evans, Herwig Schopper, Luciano Maiani and Robert Aymard, seen on July 4, 2012. That day, physicists announced to rousing applause that they had found an elementary particle "consistent with (the) long-sought Higgs boson"—a scientific milestone.

New findings are expected to be unveiled at a conference of the European Physical Society in Stockholm in July, but Gagnon stressed much more data is required for science to be convinced of the particle's identity.

As for Murray: "I'm not sure one will ever say this is the Standard Model Higgs boson.

"We will never be able to say it is the only one because there always could be one that is so incredibly heavy that you could never... make it" in the LHC.

Ironically, some would prefer the discovery of more than one Higgs, added Gagnon.

"Finding just one would confirm the Standard Model", which describes only about five percent of what the Universe is made up of, she explained.

British physicist Peter Higgs, pictured during a press conference at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) offices in Meyrin near Geneva, on July 4, 2012. The elusive boson dubbed the "God Particle" was theorised by Higgs in 1964 to be what gave mass to matter as the Universe cooled after the Big Bang.

The LHC, straddling the border between Switzerland and France, shut down last month for a two-year revamp that should allow bigger collisions and the creation of heavier particles, perhaps other Higgs bosons.

But whatever proof it yields may never be conclusive.

In science, explained Murray, "you can never prove something is right, you can only ever prove something is wrong.

"All we can do is rule out more and more alternatives."

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ant_oacute_nio354
1 / 5 (13) Jul 02, 2013
The Higgs doesn't exist.
The mass is an electric dipole moment:

m = q.k/x (1 - pi^3.alpha^2 /2)

m-mass;q-electron charge;k-Boltzmann constant;
x-Particle Compton wavelength;pi=3.1415927;alpha-fine structure constant.
kilogram = Coulomb.meter

Antonio Jose Saraiva
antialias_physorg
4.6 / 5 (11) Jul 02, 2013
Darn shame. I was hoping for a bunch of Higgs bosons.
Still - we've only a (relatively) good model for 5% of the universe. So I guess there's no need to fret. Plenty of discoveries still to be made.

you can never prove something is right, you can only ever prove something is wrong

Amen.

m = q.k/x (1 - pi^3.alpha^2 /2)

You are aware that your units don't check out at all?
JonnyMcA
5 / 5 (6) Jul 02, 2013
@Antialias, shush....dont give away the secrets of dimensional analysis that real scientists use to check their theoretical work.
MikeBowler
3 / 5 (6) Jul 02, 2013
The Higgs doesn't exist.
The mass is an electric dipole moment:

m = q.k/x (1 - pi^3.alpha^2 /2)

m-mass;q-electron charge;k-Boltzmann constant;
x-Particle Compton wavelength;pi=3.1415927;alpha-fine structure constant.
kilogram = Coulomb.meter

Antonio Jose Saraiva

The Higgs isn't said to be mass itself so your argument falls apart at the third word in the second sentence of your post.
vacuum-mechanics
1 / 5 (10) Jul 02, 2013
On July 4 last year, physicists announced to rousing applause that they had found an elementary particle "consistent with (the) long-sought Higgs boson"—a scientific milestone.

It is interesting to note that how and why the particle which was found during high energy collision, being temporary exist (also own with a bigger mass), was called as 'elementary particle', while the composite particle (also own with a smaller mass) is more stable! Maybe there is something wrong….
http://www.vacuum...=9〈=en
chardo137
1 / 5 (3) Jul 02, 2013
The standard model Higgs boson is expected to decay into two tau leptons with some regularity. Especially the CMS detector should have seen this. They didn't, even after a dedicated search of the data. This seems to suggest new physics.
GSwift7
3.9 / 5 (7) Jul 02, 2013
You are aware that your units don't check out at all?


He's just missing the constant with off-setting units. Once you do that, the answer is 42, with no units. Here's a google calculator where I worked it all out for him:

http://www.google...;bih=247

markallen127
2.3 / 5 (6) Jul 02, 2013
T.O.E. 1=0 Where 0≠-0
indio007
3 / 5 (7) Jul 02, 2013
"We have some small tensions in the data with one or two pieces that are not exactly the way you would expect... but this is not particularly significant."

Translation GIVE US OUR DAMN NOBEL PRIZE
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (7) Jul 02, 2013
As Werner Braun once said , "the basic research is when I am doing what I don't know what I am doing". Once you know it, then it's not a research anymore, but a stamp collection. There is apparently a strong political pressure to prove original Higgs boson model, which is frankly quite complicated, if you take a look at the actual data. For me the first indicia is, the other peaks didn't disappear with increasing amount of collider data - they become more pronounced instead. As a second intrinsic indicia may serve, that CERN (despite it already claimed Higgs boson as officially confirmed before many months), in the latest study consequentially uses the unconvincing "Higgs-like particle" denomination, again...;-)
ralph638s
1 / 5 (5) Jul 02, 2013
Higgs, shmiggs...
Karlsbad
3.9 / 5 (7) Jul 02, 2013
" the answer is 42, with no units. "

I don't know GSwift7, but I'm fairly confident that Higgs is having His way with the foamy structure of the Universe and Everything; which BTW in AWT, propagates as 42 ÷ 11, yielding a total of maths which are highly, if not infinitesimally, recursive of the resonant farts of Brownian 3D Aether sponge tones. Learn to respect of graviton wave spreading vacuum inside our heads; it explains simply both the dark matter, both dark energy effects, observable in the universe, Boltzmann gas, etc.
aroc91
4 / 5 (4) Jul 03, 2013
recursive of the resonant farts of Brownian 3D Aether sponge tones.


I lol'd. Don't forget the transverse longitudinal water ripples
Doc Brown
Jul 04, 2013
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Crankenstein
5 / 5 (1) Jul 04, 2013
The Higgs doesn't exist.

Yes they do: see thehiggsmusic dot com

Gosh, the Higgs is a real crackpot magnet; I count three specimens in this thread. Wait a minute... here's an idea: if we build a Higgs boson accelerator, we might be able to home in on the particles that are responsible for the physioweak cranky interaction. And then we can study the crackpot field - and perhaps build a device that nullifies it.

What do you say, Emmett, do you think it's possible?
ValeriaT
Jul 04, 2013
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
ValeriaT
Jul 04, 2013
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
ant_oacute_nio354
1 / 5 (5) Jul 05, 2013
The Higgs doesn't exist.
The mass is an electric dipole moment:

m = q.k/x (1-pi^3.alpha^2/2)

m-mass;q-electron charge;k-Boltzmann constant;
x-Compton wavelength;pi=3.1415927;ALPHA-FINE STRUCTURE CONSTANT.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (4) Jul 05, 2013
I count three specimens in this thread.

It's the same poster under three names. (Luckily. It would be a sad day for humanity of there were actually that many madmen)
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (7) Jul 06, 2013
The existing system for characterization of Higgs peaks is very sensitive to the relative noise levels outside of intervals tested and it's affected with belief in classical model, which expects/considers only one Higgs boson and with effort to publish some results before closure of LHC at any price. But the current amount of LHC data is insufficient for characterization of all five Higgses with five sigma requested, which is why the physicists are willing to recognize only one Higgs boson peak under the situation, when they starring at many of them (it's better for them to have at least one peak rather than fuzzy indicia of another four ones). It's psychosocial stuff and a matter of grant economics as well.