The Higgs boson: One year on

Jul 05, 2013 by Pauline Gagnon
Simulation of a particle collision in which a Higgs boson is produced. Credit: Lucas Taylor/CMS

A year ago today, physicists from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN proudly announced the discovery of a new boson looking very much like the Higgs boson.

After carefully starting to assess its properties, the collaborations confirmed in March this year that the particle they detected is indeed a Higgs boson. But there is still work to do to determine what kind of Higgs boson it is.

"The efforts leading to the discovery of the new boson last year could be compared to a 100-metre sprint. From now on we are entering a marathon to check its properties as best as we can to be able to distinguish between different theories," says Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director of Research and Computing.

CERN physicists working on the Higgs boson have spent the last year checking the various ways in which it can be produced, its different decay modes, as well as its spin and its parity.

So far these checks have confirmed that the particle is consistent with the Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model, a theory that describes the fundamental and how they interact.

"For me, it is really amazing to see how accurate the Standard Model predictions are. Everything is absolutely consistent so far, it is a huge achievement for the theory!" says Nazila Mahmoudi, a theorist at CERN.

However, given the on these tests, it is still premature to rule out other possibilities. For example, some models of supersymmetry predict there would be not one but five Higgs bosons. The new discovered boson would then be the lightest of them.

Work is underway to complete the analyses of all the data recorded from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) so far. More data will become available in 2015 when the LHC restarts after the ongoing consolidation program. And stay tuned for the upcoming European Physics Society conference starting on July 18 in Stockholm, Sweden, where the collaborations will present all their latest results.

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User comments : 8

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ant_oacute_nio354
1.4 / 5 (11) Jul 05, 2013
The Higgs doesn't exist.
The mass is an electric dipole moment.

Antonio Jose Saraiva
Pressure2
1 / 5 (10) Jul 05, 2013
Does a particle called the Higgs exist, sure but it has nothing to do with the origin of mass. The origin of mass is simply angular momentum at the subatomic level.
vacuum-mechanics
1 / 5 (9) Jul 05, 2013
So far these checks have confirmed that the particle is consistent with the Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model, a theory that describes the fundamental particles of matter and how they interact.
…..
However, given the experimental error on these tests, it is still premature to rule out other possibilities. For example, some models of supersymmetry predict there would be not one but five Higgs bosons. The new discovered boson would then be the lightest of them.

Let us assume that indeed we have found Higgs boson (no matter how many of them are), now what really interest us is the theory say that the Higgs boson was arisen from Higgs field, while it is also a fundamental particle so how could it be something like that? Maybe actually the Higgs boson is not really a particle, instead it is more like a condensed of Higgs field….
http://www.vacuum...=9〈=en
Q-Star
3 / 5 (8) Jul 05, 2013
So far these checks have confirmed that the particle is consistent with the Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model, a theory that describes the fundamental particles of matter and how they interact.
…..
However, given the experimental error on these tests, it is still premature to rule out other possibilities. For example, some models of supersymmetry predict there would be not one but five Higgs bosons. The new discovered boson would then be the lightest of them.

Let us assume that indeed we have found Higgs boson (no matter how many of them are), now what really interest us is the theory say that the Higgs boson was arisen from Higgs field, while it is also a fundamental particle so how could it be something like that? Maybe actually the Higgs boson is not really a particle, instead it is more like a condensed of Higgs field….
http://www.vacuum...=9〈=en


Let us assume that ya are a moron.
Egleton
1 / 5 (3) Jul 06, 2013
So now we can include gravity into the other 4 forces? Is there some handle on Gravity? Can we do anything with it? Is it manipulatable? When do we let the engineers loose?
So many questions. No answers.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (6) Jul 06, 2013
Higgs field has an analogy in density fluctuations at the water surface cause with Brownian noise of the (extradimensions of) underwater. When water surface undulates in such noisy environment, its specific surface area increases and the undulating place becomes more dense for another ripples, so it exhibits various shielding and lensing phenomena, typical for matter. It gives material properties to all energy waves. The density fluctuations have no limit in their size in dense aether model, but because we cannot see smaller or larger things than certain threshold, the mass of Higgs boson observable is limited in this way. At any case, the geometry of Higgs boson has its counterpart in the dark matter fluctuations on the sky, where we can observe five peaks as well, so that four bosons are yet to be revealed inside of the background noise.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (5) Jul 06, 2013
The existing system for characterization of Higgs peaks is very sensitive to the relative noise levels outside of intervals tested and it's affected with belief in classical model, which expects/considers only one Higgs boson and with effort to publish some results before closure of LHC at any price. But the current amount of LHC data is insufficient for characterization of all five Higgses with five sigma requested, which is why the physicists are willing to recognize only one Higgs boson peak under the situation, when they starring at many of them (it's better for them to have at least one peak rather than fuzzy indicia of another four ones). It's psychosocial stuff and a matter of grant economics as well.
vidyunmaya
1 / 5 (6) Jul 06, 2013
Himalayan blunders and Higgs peak- what is common sense ?
Cosmic Dance and Function of prime Concepts.
Intellectual hollowness mislead the spirit of Search and Research

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