Full dinosaur tail excavated in northern Mexico

Jul 23, 2013
In this undated image released by Mexico's National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH) on Monday July 22, 2013, investigators work on uncovering the tail of a dinosaur at a paleontological dig site near the town of General Cepeda in northern Mexico. Paleontologists say they have uncovered 50 vertebrae believed to be a full dinosaur tail that they say resembles the remains of a hadrosaur or crested duckbill dinosaur. Paleontologist Felisa Aguilar said they uncovered roughly half of the dinosaur which was 36 feet (12 meters) long and lived 72 million years ago. (AP Photo/INAH-Mauricio Marat)

(AP)—Mexican paleontologists say they have uncovered 50 vertebrae believed to be a full dinosaur tail in the northern desert of Coahuila state.

The National Institute of Anthropology and History says the tail is about 15 feet (5 meters) long and resembles that of a hadrosaur or crested duckbill dinosaur.

An institute Monday says it's not yet possible to confirm the species, but it would be the first full tail of that kind in Mexico.

Paleontologist Felisa Aguilar says they uncovered roughly half of the dinosaur, which was 36 feet (12 meters) long and lived about 72 million years ago.

The took 20 days in the municipality of General Cepeda in the northern state that borders Texas.

In this undated image released by Mexico's National Anthropology and History Institute (INAH) on Monday, July 22, 2013, the tail of a dinosaur is uncovered at a paleontological dig site near the town of General Cepeda in northern Mexico. Paleontologists say they have uncovered 50 vertebrae believed to be a full dinosaur tail that they say resembles the remains of a hadrosaur or crested duckbill dinosaur. Paleontologist Felisa Aguilar said they uncovered roughly half of the dinosaur which was 36 feet (12 meters) long and lived 72 million years ago. (AP Photo/INAH-Mauricio Marat)

The , working with Mexico's National Autonomous University, also found hip bones.

Explore further: Broken tooth in dino tail 'proves' T. rex was predator

5 /5 (7 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Dinosaur shook tail feathers for mating show

Jan 16, 2013

(Phys.org)—A University of Alberta researcher's examination of fossilized dinosaur tail bones has led to a breakthrough finding: some feathered dinosaurs used tail plumage to attract mates, much like modern-day ...

New 'missing link' dinosaur discovered in Argentina

Mar 23, 2011

Fossils of a recently discovered dinosaur species in Argentina is a "missing link" in the evolution of the long-necked giants that roamed the earth millions of years ago, paleontologists said.

Four dinosaur species identified

May 08, 2013

Just when dinosaur researchers thought they had a thorough knowledge of ankylosaurs, a family of squat, armour plated, plant eaters, along comes University of Alberta graduate student, Victoria Arbour.

Recommended for you

Clippers and coiners in 16th-century England

Apr 14, 2014

In 2017 a new £1 coin will appear in our pockets with a design extremely difficult to forge. In the mid-16th century, Elizabeth I's government came up with a series of measures to deter "divers evil persons" ...

Serbia experts use heavy machinery to move mammoth

Apr 11, 2014

Serbian archaeologists on Friday used heavy machinery to move a female mammoth skeleton—believed to be one million years old—from an open mine pit where it was unearthed nearly five years ago.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Online reviews: When do negative opinions boost sales?

When purchasing items online, reading customer reviews is a convenient way to get a real-world account of other people's opinions of the product. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, negative review ...

Low Vitamin D may not be a culprit in menopause symptoms

A new study from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopa ...

Astronomers: 'Tilt-a-worlds' could harbor life

A fluctuating tilt in a planet's orbit does not preclude the possibility of life, according to new research by astronomers at the University of Washington, Utah's Weber State University and NASA. In fact, ...