New device will help optimise swimming

Jul 29, 2013

A miniaturised data logger that can record speed and movement in the water will soon be available to help swimmers analyse their performance.

The development of these waterproof inertial sensors is being done at the Auckland Bioengineering Institute (ABI) with funding from the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS).

A new startup company called 'IMeasureU' has been spun out from the ABI to commercialise the tiny inertial measurement units, says lead researcher, Dr Thor Besier from the ABI.

The IMUs can provide data on the acceleration, orientation and power of the in the water and this is stored on its micro SD card and later downloaded to give the swimmer data that will enable them to improve their performance.

 "Encapsulating the printed circuit board of the IMU in waterproof materials opens it up to all sorts of new applications," says Dr Besier.

"Up until now the pool environment with the swimmer moving through both air and , and splashing and bubbles, has made it difficult to see what is going on to optimise a swimmer's performance," he says. "These IMUs can be strapped to a swimmer's body to measure the motion of the swimmer."

The researchers will develop a software program that integrates both video and the IMU data.

The immediate use for this will be for the AIS to track a swimmer's changes in speed as they go through the pool, and afterwards, give both the athlete and coach the data that will enable them to improve performance, says Dr Besier.

Explore further: Scientists trial system to improve safety at sea

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New technology to test orthopaedic designs

Jul 25, 2013

Safer and longer lasting hip and knee replacements are expected from new technology to be developed at The University of Auckland's bioengineering institute.

Swimming goes high tech with EPFL-developed inertial systems

Feb 01, 2012

Scientists from EPFL's Laboratory of Movement Analysis and Measurement have developed inertial systems, worn in a full-body swimming suit, which can analyse the strengths and weaknesses of elite-level swimmers during workout ...

Bang goes that theory!

Apr 29, 2011

An academic from Canterbury Christ Church University has disproved the theory 'you need water to swim' on a prime time television show.

Recommended for you

Scientists trial system to improve safety at sea

Jan 30, 2015

A space scientist at the University of Leicester, in collaboration with the New Zealand Defence Technology Agency and DMC International Imaging, has been trialling a concept for using satellite imagery to ...

Skin device uses motion to power electronics

Jan 29, 2015

Can a skin patch power wearables? Skin-based generators have become an area of focus among researchers working on how to scavenge muscle motion whereby skin becomes a charge-collector. A detailed report in ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.