BlackBerry cuts 250 staff at facility in Ontario

Jul 25, 2013

(AP)—BlackBerry has given layoff notices to 250 workers at its product testing facility in Waterloo, Ontario, where the global smartphone company is based.

The employees supported the company's manufacturing, research and development efforts.

BlackBerry said Thursday that the cuts were part of the next stage of its turnaround plan to increase efficiencies and scale its company correctly for new opportunities in mobile computing.

About 5,000 employees were laid off last year in restructuring efforts.

BlackBerry is trying to recover a stronger position in the highly competitive market with its new BlackBerry 10 line of phones and .

At the company's annual general meeting earlier this month, CEO Thorsten Heins told shareholders that BlackBerry is in the midst of a complex transition.

Explore further: BlackBerry chief seeks patience with turnaround (Update)

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