Washington Post unveils paywall plans

Jun 05, 2013
The Washington Post said it would start a metered paywall beginning on June 12, offering digital subscription packages at between $9.99 and $14.99 per month.

The Washington Post said Wednesday it would start a metered paywall beginning on June 12, offering digital subscription packages at between $9.99 and $14.99 per month.

The Post had been one of few remaining major US newspapers to offer its content free of charge online, but it has been facing financial struggles along with the rest of the industry.

Readers will be able to view 20 articles or features per month before being asked to subscribe, publisher Katharine Weymouth said in an online posting.

"We hope you will consider subscribing even if you don't reach the limit; a subscription will provide unlimited access to all The Post's world-class journalism, multimedia and interactive features and more," Weymouth said.

"Importantly, you will also be helping to support our newsgathering operations."

Weymouth said it would take "a few weeks" to phase in the new paywall system.

Home delivery subscribers will have digital access included. And The Post's homepage and section front pages, videos and classified advertising would be excluded from the paywall, as will articles viewed through search engines or shared links.

Digital packages will be priced at $9.99 per month for access to the desktop and $14.99 for an all-digital package which includes access to The Post's custom apps.

In its most recent results, the Co. said newspaper operations were hit by slumping circulation and revenues, offset in part by gains in digital ad sales.

Overall, the profit for the quarter was $4.7 million, a drop of 85 percent from the same period a year ago when the net profit was $31 million.

The results showed an operating loss for newspaper operations of $34.5 million.

Explore further: NY Times gains in otherwise grim newspaper sector

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NY Times gains in otherwise grim newspaper sector

Apr 30, 2013

The New York Times, boosted by gains in digital readers, rose to the number two spot among US daily newspapers in a sector still struggling with falling print circulation, industry figures showed Tuesday.

Germany's top-selling tabloid to introduce paywall

May 27, 2013

Europe's top-selling newspaper said Monday it will introduce a paywall for part of its online offerings starting next month. Main news stories will remain free of charge online, but a subscription will be ...

Murdoch's Sun tabloid to go behind paywall

Mar 27, 2013

Britain's top-selling newspaper The Sun, owned by Rupert Murdoch, is to start charging readers for access to its website, a spokeswoman confirmed on Wednesday.

World newspapers mull paywalls for survival

Jun 03, 2013

Global newspaper chiefs have some rare good news to share after years of slumping print sales and advertising revenues—readers appear increasingly willing to pay for online news.

News 'paywalls' grow, but analysts split on merit

Dec 09, 2012

The free lunch for digital access to most US newspapers is disappearing but paywalls seem at best a partial answer to the industry's woes and analysts are split on the decision to block out readers.

Recommended for you

Facebook rolls out location-sharing feature

9 minutes ago

Facebook users in the U.S. will soon be able to see which of their friends are in close proximity using a new feature the company is launching on Thursday.

Net neutrality balancing act

4 hours ago

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

Apr 16, 2014

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

Apr 16, 2014

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Skepticus
3 / 5 (2) Jun 05, 2013
Propaganda should be free. If it is free, it is...also propaganda!

More news stories

Turning off depression in the brain

Scientists have traced vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in mice to out-of-balance electrical activity inside neurons of the brain's reward circuit and experimentally reversed it – but there's ...

There's something ancient in the icebox

Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything—vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were greatly surprised ...