Va. launch provides good data on galaxy creation

Jun 06, 2013
A NASA Black Brant XII suborbital rocket streaks into the night sky following its launch at 11:05 p.m. Wednesday June 5, 2013 in this time lapse image from the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The rocket carried the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) to an altitude of approximately 358 miles above the Atlantic Ocean by the four-stage rocket. The launch was reportedly seen from as far away as central New Jersey, southeastern Pennsylvania and northeastern North Carolina. With CIBER, scientists are studying when the first stars and galaxies formed in the universe and how brightly they burned their nuclear fuel. (AP Photo/NASA, Jamie Adkins)

Researchers are studying data on galaxy creation collected by an experiment launched from Virginia's Wallops Island Flight Facility.

NASA says a Black Brant XII suborbital rocket carrying the ExpeRiment, or CIBER, was launched at 11:05 p.m. Wednesday.

CIBER principal investigator Jamie Bock with the California Institute of Technology says researchers received good data from the rocket's payload.

A Black Brant XII suborbital rocket carrying the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) launches at 11:05 p.m. Wednesday June 5, 2013 from NASA's launch range at the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. With CIBER, scientists are studying when the first stars and galaxies formed in the universe and how brightly they burned their nuclear fuel. CIBER was lofted to an altitude of approximately 358 miles above the Atlantic Ocean by the four-stage, 70-foot tall rocket. The launch was reportedly seen from as far away as central New Jersey, southeastern Pennsylvania and northeastern North Carolina. (AP Photo/NASA, Terry Zaperach)

The experiment will study when the first formed in the universe and how brightly they burned their nuclear fuel.

Explore further: Rocket launch from Va. spaceport rescheduled

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