Can 30-second ads save newspapers?

Jun 10, 2013

(Phys.org) —A researcher from Murdoch University's Audience Labs suggests economically pinched news outlets should take advantage of positive attitudes to online TV ads as a better way to balance the books.

Dr Steve Bellman said his research into attitudes to advertisements inside such as that on YouTube and Yahoo!7 indicated a level of acceptance for TV ads in the cyber realm.

"For years, we've heard the argument that people won't tolerate ads in online content and will jump sites to ad-free content or will download illegally, but our research on web-based video viewing shows that people will accept a certain number of ads," Dr Bellman said.

"Online only rated ad as significantly intrusive if there were ten 30-second ads per hour or more, but they were fine with slightly fewer.

Dr Bellman said his study found the ideal number of ads for viewers and advertisers to be six 30-second ads per hour, totalling three minutes, which while significantly less than the 18 minutes per hour currently showing on TV, offered enhanced opportunities for companies.

"TV viewers have a fairly high tolerance for what we call 'clutter' – that is, non-program and ad content – but online is different in that people are more sensitive to ads," Dr Bellman said.

"However, online is a high-quality, uncluttered environment for advertisers. Three ad-minutes per hour online results in high product recall, especially if there is only one ad per break."

Dr Bellman said the findings could potentially be adapted as a lifeline for struggling news outlets.

"Clearly the old newspaper funding model is dead, but we haven't seen anything come along to replace it, which has resulted in of journalists and constriction of coverage," he said.

"Some Australian outlets have turned to paywalls – and others are rumoured to be ready to follow – but the paywall experiment has been tried in the industry before, here and abroad, and hasn't worked.

"Unless you're the Wall Street Journal, which has exclusive content valued by business, you're better off looking at a new approach.

"With broadband, newspaper content online is looking more and more like TV, perhaps it's time for outlets to test the waters of showing that interrupt online content. If it works for , there's no reason to think newspapers would be different."

The study 'Getting the Balance Right' involved Murdoch University, RMIT University and The Disney Media & Advertising Lab in Austin, Texas.

Explore further: Entrepreneurs to venture capitalists: Don't be a Scrooge

More information: www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10… 7410201#.UbWYR_llnux

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Yahoo! in online ad alliance with Google

Feb 07, 2013

Yahoo! on Wednesday announced an advertising alliance with Google, the company that dethroned the pioneering Internet firm in the world of Internet search.

US Internet ad revenue grows 15 percent in 2012

Apr 16, 2013

U.S. Internet advertising revenue grew 15 percent to a record $36.6 billion in 2012, with mobile ad revenue growing faster than other types, according to a new report Tuesday.

Cablevision unveils interactive banner ads on TV

Sep 16, 2009

(AP) -- Cablevision Systems Corp. is bringing interactive banner ads to television, allowing viewers to order samples and brochures and even purchase products by clicking the remote on their TV sets.

US regulators want clear fine print in mobile ads

Mar 13, 2013

The US Federal Trade Commission called Tuesday for potentially bedeviling fine print to be "clear and conspicuous" as ads follow people onto smartphone screens or online social networks.

Recommended for you

Over-identifying restrictions in economic analysis

Nov 25, 2014

The analysis of empirical economics has long made use of a tool called the generalized method of moments (GMM). This method is used as a generic way of estimating parameters in an empirical model where the ...

Tracking Chinese aid to Africa

Nov 24, 2014

Is a fancy new school in an African government official's hometown a coincidence, or evidence of systematic favouritism in the distribution of aid?

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

geokstr
1 / 5 (2) Jun 10, 2013
The only thing that can save "news"papers, and their quisling counterparts in the electronic media, is to actually take a balanced and impartial approach to "news" for a change, instead of being on their knees both in front of and behind Obama.

If Obama had been just reasonably vetted by the "unbiased", "objective" "news" media in 2008/2012, or even in any of his previous elections, he'd still be just another race-baiting street hustler in Chicago a la Al Sharpton.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.