Photos: Largest and brightest full moon of year

Jun 24, 2013 by The Associated Press
A supermoon sets near the Statue of Liberty, Sunday, June 23, 2013, in New York. The larger than normal moon called the "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth and is 13.5 percent larger than usual. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Stargazers are still abuzz over the biggest and brightest full moon of the year, which graced the skies over the weekend.

The so-called supermoon appeared up to 14 percent larger than normal as our celestial neighbor swung closer to Earth, reaching its closest distance early Sunday morning.

Here are of the supermoon:

A supermoon sets near the Statue of Liberty, Sunday, June 23, 2013, in New York. The larger than normal moon called the "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth and is 13.5 percent larger than usual. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

The super moon is seen in the night sky over Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, June 23, 2013. The larger than normal moon called the "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth and is 13.5 percent larger than usual. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

A full super moon sets behind the top of one of the minarets at the University of Tampa Sunday, June 23, 2013, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

A Supermoon rises through a clear sky past a string of yellow lights, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, June 23, 2013. The moon, which will reach its full stage on Sunday, is expected to be 13.5 percent closer to earth during a phenomenon known as supermoon. The "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

A Supermoon, right, rises through a clear sky past a green light hanging a boat, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, June 23, 2013. The moon, which will reach its full stage on Sunday, is expected to be 13.5 percent closer to earth during a phenomenon known as supermoon. The "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

The moon rises next the Los Angeles Angels' "Big A" sign during their baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates, Saturday, June 22, 2013, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

A "supermoon" rises behind the Home Place clock tower in Prattville, Ala., Saturday, June 22, 2013. The biggest and brightest full moon of the year graces the sky early Sunday as our celestial neighbor swings closer to Earth than usual. While the moon will appear 14 percent larger than normal, sky watchers won't be able to notice the difference with the naked eye. Still, astronomers say it's worth looking up and appreciating the cosmos. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

A statue of the Angel Moroni on top a Latter-day Saints temple is silhouetted against the rising moon Saturday, June 22, 2013, in Kansas City, Mo. The moon, which will reach its full stage on Sunday, is expected to be 13.5 percent closer to earth during a phenomenon known as supermoon. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

A full moon rises behind the Jefferson Memorial in Washington Saturday, June 22, 2013. The larger than normal moon called the "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

A super moon sets behind the top of one of the minarets at the University of Tampa Sunday, June 23, 2013, in Tampa, Fla. The larger than normal moon called the "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth and is 13.5 percent larger than usual. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

The larger-than-normal full moon referred to as Supermoon is seen setting beyond a refinery in Norco, La., Sunday, June 23, 2013. The larger than normal moon called the "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth and is 13.5 percent larger than usual. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

A cotton candy vendor, center, walks in from of the moon during the Los Angeles Angels' baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates, Saturday, June 22, 2013, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Fans sit as the moon rises behind them during the Los Angeles Angels' baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates, Saturday, June 22, 2013, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The moon is seen in its waxing gibbous stage as it rises over Lower Manhattan, including One World Trade Center, center, seen from The Heights neighborhood of Jersey City, N.J., Saturday, June 22, 2013. The moon, which will reach its full stage on Sunday, is expected to be seen 13.5 percent larger than usual during a phenomenon known as supermoon. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

A full moon rises behind the Jefferson Memorial in Washington Saturday, June 22, 2013. The larger than normal moon called the "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

A "supermoon" rises behind the Home Place clock tower in Prattville, Ala., Saturday, June 22, 2013. The biggest and brightest full moon of the year graces the sky early Sunday as our celestial neighbor swings closer to Earth than usual. While the moon will appear 14 percent larger than normal, sky watchers won't be able to notice the difference with the naked eye. Still, astronomers say it's worth looking up and appreciating the cosmos. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

The moon is seen in its waxing gibbous stage as it rises behind the helicopter from the original Batman television show, which people can ride at the New Jersey State Fair, Saturday, June 22, 2013, in East Rutherford, N.J. The moon, which will reach its full stage on Sunday, is expected to be 13.5 percent closer to earth during a phenomenon known as supermoon. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)


Explore further: Super full moon shines brightly this weekend (Update)

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gwrede
1 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2013
Brightest full moon this year, and the media are going crazy like it was once in a lifetime news! What's wrong with people? Millions and millions climb trees and rooftops to see the "supermoon", as if the moon was doing something unheard of.

Yes, sometimes the full moon is up to 7 per cent bigger than the average and sometimes it's up to 7 per cent smaller than average. Both of these happen virtually every year. No ancient astronomer has bothered to write this down anywhere, nor has it been made to a national holiday anywhere.

Yes, the supermoon was literally unheard of. And with good reason, the very word was coined by an astrologer, not an astronomer, and even that only some thirty years ago. The word does not deserve to be heard of, because it is a big word for such a trivial concept.

I'd like to think there are less trivial things to waste our days on.

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