New study points to increased incomes from music streaming

Jun 04, 2013

The issue of intellectual property rights in the music industry remains a hot topic, and the debate seems to intensify every time technological advances are made. A new doctoral thesis from the School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, shows that the total incomes of music composers have increased significantly in the last 15 years, despite the file sharing revolution.

Based on Swedish statistics from 1980-2009, the study concludes that the music industry's claim in the debate is true: it has lost revenue due to illicit downloading. Yet the study also shows that the composers have been able to increase their incomes substantially over the same period through increased revenues from concerts, radio and TV. And their revenues from music streaming have grown rapidly since 2010.

'In 2011 their income from music streaming increased by 70 % from the year before, and today downloads are generating more income than ,' says the author of the thesis Staffan Albinsson, researcher in economic history.

Albinsson believes that innovations such as Spotify have helped tone down the debate.

'The consumer can access a lot of material without breaking the law, and the rights holders are getting paid. There is no need for a discussion until next time new technology is introduced,' says Staffan Albinsson, who refers to the , the gramophone, radio and cassette tapes as good examples of past technological innovations that have sparked debate about at different times in history.

Albinsson wishes the debate would give more attention to the qualitative implications of .

'I'm convinced that different forms of intellectual property rights have different qualitative implications,' he says. The most illegally downloaded music is probably also the most expensive music to produce, and if the high costs cannot be recovered, this music won't be there to enjoy.'

Explore further: Highly connected CEOs more likely to broker mergers and acquisitions that harm firms

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

How the industry can fight back against pirated music

Feb 05, 2013

New research estimates that 28% of digital music world-wide is pirated using illegal file-sharing. The findings shed light on financial difficulties in the music industry experienced by companies such as ...

Flat year for US music industry, survey says

Mar 27, 2013

US music industry sales held nearly steady in 2012 as gains from digital subscription services offset further declines in physical disc sales, an industry survey showed Wednesday.

When it comes to music, Sweden goes up stream

Mar 10, 2013

Despite being home to a vibrant community of file-sharing activists, Sweden is at the forefront of a global recovery in music sales driven by streaming music services such as Spotify, industry observers say.

Swedish music sales 'boosted by Spotify'

Jan 18, 2013

Music sales in Sweden rose last year thanks to the growing popularity of music streaming service Spotify, the country's music industry body said, offering hope to a sector battered by file-sharing.

Streaming music gains in US market

Apr 02, 2013

Streaming music services like Pandora online radio are gaining fast among US listeners under age 35, a survey showed Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Migrant employment on the rise

20 hours ago

Skilled migrants are enjoying better jobs and higher levels of employment thanks to a shift in policy, according to a new study by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University ...

Three hours of life per euro

Oct 15, 2014

Public spending appears to have contributed substantially to the fact that life expectancy in eastern Germany has not only increased, but is now almost equivalent to life expectancy in the west. While the possible connection ...

User comments : 0