Giant 3-D printed bugs shed light on insect anatomy

Jun 19, 2013
CSIRO researcher, Chad Henry with the 3D titanium bugs.

Minute insects, from the Australian National Insect Collection, have been super sized by up to forty times using a novel 3D scanning system and printed using a state of the art 3D printer.

The 3D show new potential for studying the anatomy of miniscule creatures by enabling them to physically handle the insects and study their features up close.

Scientists believe this technology will soon enable them to determine characteristics, such as gender, and examine surface characteristics which are otherwise difficult due to the minute size.

Originally created for a national art exhibition, CSIRO Science Art Fellow Eleanor Gates-Stuart, said the bugs they are working with are micro sized, some only clearly visible under the microscope.

"We combined science and art to engage the public and through the process we've discovered that 3D printing could be the way of the future for studying these creatures," she added.

To create the bug, scientists scan the insect to generate a computer aided design (CAD) file. The CAD file is then entered into the 3D printing machine.

CSIRO's Additive Manufacturing Operations Manager, Chad Henry, said that compared to conventional methods of manufacturing, 3D printing is highly efficient and environmentally friendly.

"The process is perfect for building fine scale features to capture all of the intricate details of the bugs," he said.

Giant 3-D printed bugs shed light on insect anatomy
Up close and personal with the CSIRO printed titanium bugs.

The 3D printing machine adds layer upon layer of titanium to build up each bug. Up to 12 bugs can be produced at a time and after 10 hours in the machine; the bugs emerge from the titanium powder.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
A weevil scanned using novel 3D scanning process. (Credit: Chuong Nguyen, CSIRO researcher)

"Giant bug production is not necessarily where we saw ourselves going, however, this project is exciting because it brings together two key areas of science - manufacturing and entomology," Chad Henry added.

CSIRO's additive manufacturing facility, Lab 22, is currently being used to manufacture a range of prototype products including , automotive, aerospace and defence parts for Australian industry.

Explore further: 3D printing 'could herald new industrial revolution'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Scientists use 3-D printing to track big fish

Feb 07, 2013

CSIRO scientists are using 3D printing to build a new generation of hi-tech fish tags made of titanium. The aim is to use the tags to track big fish such as marlin, tuna, swordfish, trevally and sharks for ...

Could eating insects solve world food shortage?

Mar 01, 2012

Creating tasty food items from ground-up insects could be a solution to global food shortages, according to Insects Au Gratin, an exhibition featuring 3D food printing technology.

3D printing tiny batteries

Jun 18, 2013

(Phys.org) —3D printing can now be used to print lithium-ion microbatteries the size of a grain of sand. The printed microbatteries could supply electricity to tiny devices in fields from medicine to communications, ...

Recommended for you

A smart prosthetic knee with in-vivo diagnoses

Apr 22, 2014

The task was to develop intelligent prosthetic joints that, via sensors, are capable of detecting early failure long before a patient suffers. EPFL researchers have taken up the challenge.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Amazon launches grocery service for Prime members

Amazon is taking aim at grocery stores and discounters like Wal-Mart with a grocery service that lets its Prime loyalty club members fill up to a 45-pound box with groceries and get it shipped for a flat rate of $5.99.

Study suggests targeting B cells may help with MS

A new study suggests that targeting B cells, which are a type of white blood cell in the immune system, may be associated with reduced disease activity for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The study is released today ...