Booz Allen says it's fired Snowden after leak

Jun 11, 2013
Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden in New York's Union Square Park, Monday, June 10, 2013. Snowden, who says he worked as a contractor at the National Security Agency and the CIA, gave classified documents to reporters, making public two sweeping U.S. surveillance programs and touching off a national debate on privacy versus security. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Edward Snowden, who admitted leaking details of secret U.S. government surveillance programs, was fired by his employer Tuesday while the U.S. government considers criminal charges against him.

Booz Allen Hamilton said in a statement that it fired Snowden on Monday "for violations of the firm's code of ethics and firm policy." It said he had earned a salary of $122,000 a year. The firm called Snowden's actions "shocking" and said he had been a Booz Allen employee for less than three months.

President 's administration is weighing whether to charge Snowden with leaking classified surveillance secrets while it defends the broad U.S. spy program that it says keeps America safe from terrorists.

Snowden, 29, has identified himself as the person who leaked top-. He fled to Hong Kong in hopes of escaping criminal charges.

Booz Allen provides consulting services, technology support and analysis to U.S. government agencies and departments. Last year, 98 percent of the company's $5.9 billion in revenue came from U.S. . Three-fourths of its 25,000 employees hold government security clearances. Half the employees have top secret clearances.

Snowden previously worked for the CIA and likely obtained his security clearance there. But like others who leave the government to join private contractors, he was able to keep his clearance after he left and began working for outside firms.

Once given security clearance, workers can access offices, files and, most important, dedicated communications and computer networks that are walled off from the public.

Snowden says he accessed and downloaded the last of the documents that detailed the while working in an NSA office in Hawaii for Booz Allen.

The U.S. Justice Department, facing a global uproar over the programs that track phone and Internet messages around the world, is investigating whether the Snowden's actions were criminal.

Meanwhile, the European Parliament planned to debate the spy programs Tuesday and whether they have violated local privacy protections. EU officials in Brussels pledged to seek answers from U.S. diplomats at a trans-Atlantic ministerial meeting in Dublin later this week.

The global scrutiny comes after revelations from Snowden, who has chosen to reveal his identity. Snowden has fled to Hong Kong in hopes of escaping as lawmakers including Senate intelligence chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein accuse him of committing an "act of treason" that should be prosecuted.

Officials in Germany and the European Union issued calm but firm complaints Monday over two National Security Agency programs that target suspicious foreign messages—potentially including phone numbers, email, images, video and other online communications transmitted through U.S. providers. British Foreign Secretary William Hague tried to assure Parliament that the spy programs do not encroach on U.K. privacy laws.

Glenn Greenwald, a reporter of The Guardian newspaper, speaks during an interview in Hong Kong Monday, June 10, 2013. Greenwald reported a 29-year-old contractor who claims to have worked at the National Security Agency and the CIA allowed himself to be revealed Sunday as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, risking prosecution by the U.S. government. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

And in Washington, members of Congress said they would take a new look at potential ways to keep the U.S. safe from terror attacks without giving up privacy protections.

"There's very little trust in the government, and that's for good reason," said Rep. Adam Schiff, a Democrat who sits on the House of Representatives Intelligence Committee. "We're our own worst enemy."

Republican House Speaker John Boehner, however, said he believes Obama has fully explained why the program is needed. He told ABC's "Good Morning America" Tuesday that "the disclosure of this information puts Americans at risk. It shows our adversaries what our capabilities are and it's a giant violation of the law." He called Snowden a "traitor."

A senior U.S. intelligence official on Monday said there were no plans to scrap the programs that, despite the backlash, continue to receive widespread if cautious support within Congress. The official spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the sensitive security issue.

The programs were revealed last week by The Guardian and The Washington Post newspapers. National Intelligence Director James Clapper has taken the unusual step of declassifying some of the previously top-secret details to help the administration mount a public defense of the surveillance as a necessary step to protect Americans.

Clapper came under fire from one of the staunchest critics of government surveillance programs, Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat. He said Clapper did not give him a straight answer last March when he asked whether the National Security Agency collects any data on millions of Americans.

Wyden, a member of the Senate intelligence committee, called for hearings to discuss the surveillance programs. He was also among a group of senators who introduced legislation Tuesday to force the government to declassify opinions of a secret court that authorizes the surveillance.

This Monday, June 10, 2013 photo shows the National Security Agency's Utah Data Center in Bluffdale, Utah. The Obama administration says it has no plans to end a broad U.S. spy program that it says is keeping America safe from terrorists. That comes as the White House faces fresh anger at home and from abroad over its secretive surveillance system that tracks phone and Internet messages around the world. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

"The American people have the right to expect straight answers from the intelligence leadership to the questions asked by their representatives," Wyden said in a statement.

He was referring to an exchange with Clapper during a committee meeting in March when Clapper denied the NSA collected any type of data on millions of Americans, then softened his answer by adding "not wittingly." Wyden said he gave Clapper the chance to amend his answer but he did not.

One of the NSA programs gathers hundreds of millions of U.S. phone records to search for possible links to known terrorist targets abroad. The other allows the government to tap into nine U.S. Internet companies and gather all communications to detect suspicious behavior that begins overseas.

The first explosive document Snowden revealed was a top secret court order issued by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that granted a three-month renewal for a massive collection of American phone records. That order was signed April 25.

Snowden also gave the Post and the Guardian a PowerPoint presentation on another secret program that collects online usage by the nine Internet providers. The U.S. government says it uses that information only to track foreigners' use overseas.

Believing his role would soon be exposed, Snowden fled last month to Hong Kong.

Although Hong Kong has an extradition treaty with the U.S., the document has some exceptions, including for crimes deemed political. Any negotiations about his possible handover will involve Beijing, but some analysts believe China is unlikely to want to jeopardize its relationship with Washington over someone it would consider of little political interest.

Explore further: Intelligence official: No plans to end broad surveillance program (Update)

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User comments : 20

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Stephen_Crowley
1 / 5 (10) Jun 11, 2013
Cave_Man
1.5 / 5 (8) Jun 11, 2013
So if 90% of America supports what he did, how is he a traitor?

I thought America was for, by and of the people? I think our "leaders" would tend to disagree.....

I for one plan to stop voting and I will do whatever I can legally to not pay a cent in taxes to these criminals who do things for the sake of national security when what they REALLY do it for is FINANCIAL security.
VendicarE
3 / 5 (6) Jun 11, 2013
Sounds like a good reason for an audit by the IRS to me.

"I for one plan to stop voting and I will do whatever I can legally to not pay a cent in taxes'" - Cave Man
VendicarE
3.3 / 5 (7) Jun 11, 2013
Secret courts are incompatible with Democracy, and the U.S. is full of them thanks to Corrupt, Republican Rule.

"Tuesday to force the government to declassify opinions of a secret court that authorizes the surveillance." - Article
Shakescene21
1 / 5 (8) Jun 11, 2013
I have no problem with NSA monitoring my phone calls if that can save a single human life from terrorists. Since I'm a Verizon customer, NSA must already be doing it.
dav_daddy
1.7 / 5 (12) Jun 11, 2013
Secret courts are incompatible with Democracy, and the U.S. is full of them thanks to Corrupt, Republican Rule.

"Tuesday to force the government to declassify opinions of a secret court that authorizes the surveillance." - Article


We all know Obama is the poster child for corrupt Republicans?

It's people like you making comments like that which give all Democrats a bad name.
zaxxon451
3 / 5 (4) Jun 12, 2013
I have no problem with NSA monitoring my phone calls if that can save a single human life from terrorists. Since I'm a Verizon customer, NSA must already be doing it.


Which terrorists? Those responsible for 9/11 or the terrorists that America creates with each drone strike? I'm pretty sure we're just working on the latter right now with our hamster wheel foreign policy.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (1) Jun 12, 2013
The bit about clearances wasn't as clear as it could have been. The position required clearance; requiring Booz Allen Hamilton to re-submit him probably wouldn't have changed anything. Regardless of the origin, clearances have to be re-examined regularly. The clearance system is never going to be completely foolproof. Maybe instead, somebody, or some process should come under scrutiny for insufficient compartmentalization.

Maybe they should adjust the clearance process to try to weed out altruistic tendencies, as those seem to have contributed to many of the recently publicized leaks. Only accept thoroughly burned out cynics.
antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (4) Jun 12, 2013
I for one plan to stop voting

I agree with the for/by/of the people part. But stopping to vote has the exact opposite effect of what you're trying to achieve (since it means that the votes of all the people who are content with how things are being run count more)

Secret courts are incompatible with Democracy, and the U.S. is full of them thanks to Corrupt, Republican Rule.

This may be true. But one has to admit that the Democrats aren't exactly falling over themselves trying to get rid of these.

It's a general problem of having power elites that only differ in name - because any lobby group worth its salt has by now subverted both.

Maybe they should adjust the clearance process

It won't change anything. People can change their minds faster than you can re-audit them.

weed out altruistic tendencies

And here I was thinking that a stable, moral and ethical society is all about altruism. My bad.
Shakescene21
1 / 5 (6) Jun 12, 2013
"...but some analysts believe China is unlikely to want to jeopardize its relationship with Washington over someone it would consider of little political interest."

In my opinion the Obama Administration would want China to give Snowden sanctuary, and then put him away in some remote place. (Despite official claims that the US wants Snowden returned for trial.) This would lessen the political controversy in America and give Snowden a chance to study China's monitoring network firsthand.
DavidW
1.3 / 5 (12) Jun 12, 2013
This may be true.


You have already said on these forums that truth isn't real. Please stop using a word that you do not believe represents a real aspect of our reality with others, as if you do. It's a disingenuous response.

Obama says that we should open a debate on the subject.

Who could debate this without the truth, let alone vote on it.

The most important thing in life is life. We can't do a thing or argue the point that it is without it. That's a truth and is specifically states life IS MOST important.

So basically he wants anyone to debate the subject, even those that completely disregard the the existence of truth and those that do not follow the truth by needlessly killing animals for personal enjoyment. It's one thing to kill an animal and eat it as necessary means to stay alive yourself. In this case, the importance of life and truth are still respected and violated. It is quite another to kill for personal enjoyment (belly pleasure alone). -to be cont..
DavidW
1.3 / 5 (13) Jun 12, 2013
Those of us that take life needlessly are ignoring the truth that life is most important.

Are we really suppose to find solutions in a debate by including those that ignore the mandate of the truth itself in a debate?

It's just that simple. The truth says life is the most important thing in life. When we kill for enjoyment we are ignoring the truth and choose to exist in a narcissistic and sick mindset that is not factually based in reality.

If we have a problem with not committing a harmful action, we should at least admit the truth that our actions are harmful, that the truth is logical, and that we are dealing with a problem internally. If a person can do that, I think they deserve a place in such a debate on privacy. If they can't/won't/don't and are killing life for enjoyment alone, they have no place in a debate of of what's truthfully the best thing to do, as they have dismissed the truth from the get go.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.9 / 5 (12) Jun 12, 2013
Which terrorists? Those responsible for 9/11 or the terrorists that America creates with each drone strike? I'm pretty sure we're just working on the latter right now with our hamster wheel foreign policy
Cause and effect dude. When these obsolete religionist cultures stop forcing their women to do nothing but produce legions of disgruntled youth with nothing else to do but starve or fight, then we will no longer have the need to protect ourselves from them, WILL WE?
Please stop using a word that you do not believe represents a real aspect of our reality with others
And please stop using a word you have no respect for as your religion is based on nothing other than LIES. As are they all.

Oh and dave has anybody told you to STFU yet today? Did you listen to them?

No.
zaxxon451
5 / 5 (2) Jun 12, 2013
[Cause and effect dude. When these obsolete religionist cultures stop forcing their women to do nothing but produce legions of disgruntled youth with nothing else to do but starve or fight, then we will no longer have the need to protect ourselves from them, WILL WE?


Don't let your hate for religion blind you to the facts. Sure religion is often a negative influence on people, but it is naive to blame it for all the world's problems.
DavidW
1.4 / 5 (10) Jun 12, 2013
[Cause and effect dude. When these obsolete religionist cultures stop forcing their women to do nothing but produce legions of disgruntled youth with nothing else to do but starve or fight, then we will no longer have the need to protect ourselves from them, WILL WE?


Don't let your hate for religion blind you to the facts. Sure religion is often a negative influence on people, but it is naive to blame it for all the world's problems.


It's the lie and it can come from anywhere at any time. It may be familiar and so we may be able to avoid the pitfall or it may not be familiar and something we have not experienced before. We must adhere to the truth first in guidance to avoid getting mislead.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.4 / 5 (10) Jun 12, 2013
Sure religion is often a negative influence on people, but it is naive to blame it for all the world's problems.
Naive? Religion will kill us all if we allow it to.

The main cause of all the strife in the world is overpopulation. The religions we are left with are the ones which were better at outgrowing and overrunning their counterparts. They are now the main cause of overpopulation.

Wherever these religionist cultures still reign, there is starvation, misery, and war. It is NAIVE to think that they want isolation. They WANT space and resources for their growing populations, and are in the process of taking it from others all over the world.

At 9:20. 'By islamic propagation or by the rifle.'
http://www.youtub...IO_gwRgo

-As sam harris and others will tell you, the west is not in a war against terrorism, it is in a war against religion. If not fought elsewhere it will inevitably be fought in our own streets and homes. There is no avoiding this.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.4 / 5 (10) Jun 12, 2013
We must adhere to the truth first in guidance to avoid getting mislead
The truth is dave you are a drone of a rather mundane sort,

Sam harris likes jainism. Ever hear of it? They like life too. They wear masks so that they might not inhale some poor bug.

But as we can see with only a little research, they are violent too, by proxy.
'Jain Nuns Support Hindu Terrorism'
http://jainsamach...ism.html

-and are constructed on the same sort of superstitious nonsense as any of them. Superstition disconnects reason from thought. It leaves a person open to all manner of odious behavior in defense of that superstition.
zaxxon451
not rated yet Jun 12, 2013
Naive? Religion will kill us all if we allow it to.


Religion is a tool nothing more, nothing less. Much like the "War on Terror", those with power wield it to further their own ends.
Humpty
1 / 5 (11) Jul 02, 2013
Booz Allen Hamilton - says they just fired Snowden....

Well that is so nice to see they have done it - like 2 or 3 weeks after the fact....

Palm greasing arseholes.
JohnGee
1.4 / 5 (8) Jul 03, 2013
The article is three weeks old moron.

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