Second Atlantic season tropical depression forms

Jun 17, 2013
Tropical Depression 2 formed in the western Caribbean Sea during the early afternoon hours (Eastern Daylight Time) on June 17. NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured an image of the storm as it consolidated enough to become a tropical depression while approaching the coast of Belize. Credit: NASA GOES Project/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Tropical Depression 2 formed in the western Caribbean Sea during the early afternoon hours (Eastern Daylight Time) on June 17. NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured an image of the storm as it consolidated enough to become a tropical depression while approaching the coast of Belize. NOAA's GOES-13 satellite sits in a fixed orbit and monitors the weather in the eastern half of the continental United States and the Atlantic Ocean. NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland uses the data from GOES-13 and creates imagery.

NASA's GOES Project created an image of Tropical Depression 2 from June 17 at 1:10 p.m. EDT. Looking closely at the imagery, strong thunderstorms are firing up around the center of circulation, just off-shore from Belize. The clouds associated with the depression stretch much farther, from far western Cuba, to the eastern , and over Belize and Honduras.

The National Hurricane Center designated the low pressure area as Tropical Depression 2 at 11 a.m. EDT. At that time it had near 35 mph (55 kph) and was moving to the west-northwest at 13 mph (20 kph). Tropical Depression 2 is located near 16.2 north and 87.6 west, about 60 miles (95 km) east of Monkey River Town, Belize.

The center of the depression will move inland over southern Belize this afternoon where no change in strength is expected as it moves over land. The depression could emerge into the Bay of Campeche on Tuesday, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). NHC noted that an increase in strength is possible on Tuesday if the center emerges into the Bay of Campeche. If that happens, 2 could become Tropical Storm Barry.

Explore further: Geologist identifies new source of methane for gas hydrates in Arctic

Related Stories

Recommended for you

NASA image: Fires in Southeastern Australia

2 hours ago

The fires superimposed on the satellite image of southeastern Australia designated by red spots may be indicative of "planned burns" by the Victoria region. This map: http://www.depi.vic.gov.au/fire-and-emergencies/planned-burns/planned-burns-now-and-next-10-days found on the Department of the Environment and Primary Industries for the State of Victoria shows the burns th ...

NASA sees Maysak become a super typhoon

2 hours ago

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Typhoon Maysak as it strengthened into a super typhoon on March 31, reaching Category 5 hurricane status on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. The TRMM and GPM satellites, ...

A new tool to understand volcanic supereruptions

5 hours ago

To understand when and why volcanoes erupt, scientists study the rocks left behind by eruptions past. A method called geobarometry uses the composition of volcanic rocks to estimate the pressure and depth ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.