Apple enlists Winnie-the-Pooh in e-book argument

June 4, 2013 by Larry Neumeister

(AP)—An Apple Inc. lawyer is using Winnie-the-Pooh and tens of millions of customers too to try to convince a judge that the computer giant did not manipulate e-book prices when it opened an online bookstore.

Attorney Orin Snyder enlisted the popular children's title as he questioned the top executive at publisher Penguin Group USA on Tuesday. It was the second day of an anti-trust resulting from a lawsuit brought last year by the Justice Department.

Penguin CEO David Shanks conceded that the Winnie-the-Pooh book looks "beautiful" in color on Apple products and not as good in black and white on others. He says "irrational enthusiasm" about the potential for 80 million to 100 million new Apple customers led the company to meet many of Apple's demands in 2010.

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