Aligning values with employer can lead to promotion, suggests new study

Jun 06, 2013 by Neil Schoenherr

Employees looking to move up within their organization should get on board with the goals and values of their employer, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

The study, "Status and the True Believer: The Impact of Psychological Contracts on Social Status Attributions of Friendship and Influence," shows that employees who are "true believers" in the mission of their organization gain more influence in the company, while those who are not as invested in the company's mission become pushed to the periphery.
"In mission-driven companies—companies like Whole Foods Market or REI—the people who emerge as leaders are more than just nice guys. They are the ones who embrace the mission and values of the organization," says Stuart Bunderson, PhD, the George and Carol Bauer Professor of Organizational Ethics & Governance at Olin Business School and co-author of the study.

"But the belief has to be real," Bunderson says "Faking a value system that aligns with your employer won't work."

The researchers tested their hypotheses in two organizations, a for-profit business and a not-for-profit service organization that explicitly embrace a social cause as part of their missions. They found that positions of and influence more often went to the " believers."

The study is scheduled to appear in the management journal Organization Science

Explore further: Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance

More information: orgsci.journal.informs.org/con… 3.0827.full.pdf+html

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hemitite
not rated yet Jun 06, 2013
This guy got PAYED to claim that kissing a** can get one promoted!
ToolMan78
1 / 5 (2) Jun 06, 2013
Did someone really waste their time "testing" this? I'd love to find out how they came to the conclusion that, "Faking a value system that aligns with your employer won't work."
Bigbobswinden
not rated yet Jun 08, 2013
Sucking up to the boss has always paid dividends, and he believes every lie you tell him as long as it polishes his ego.
Neinsense99
1 / 5 (3) Aug 02, 2013
Did someone really waste their time "testing" this? I'd love to find out how they came to the conclusion that, "Faking a value system that aligns with your employer won't work."

It worked for the 'Fox News mole' for several years. He's even got a book about it.