Volcano heating up in Alaska: Second one this month

May 13, 2013 by Rachel D'oro

Another volcano in Alaska is heating up, with seismic instruments signaling a possible eruption.

The says tremors were detected Monday at Pavlof Volcano, 625 miles southwest of Anchorage.

John Power, the U.S. Geological Survey scientist in charge at the observatory, says satellite imagery shows the volcano is "very, very hot."

Pavlof is 37 miles from the community of Cold Bay. The volcano last erupted in 2007.

It's the second Alaska volcano to rumble this month.

Cleveland Volcano, on an uninhabited island in the , experienced a low-level eruption in early May. Power says satellite imagery shows the volcano continues to discharge steam, gas and heat, although no have been detected in the past week.

Cleveland is not monitored with seismic instruments.

Explore further: Alaska's Mount Redoubt spews ash 50,000 feet high

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