Tone-deaf female cowbirds change flock behavior, disrupt social networks

May 01, 2013
Lesioned females destabilize the social network of mixed-sex flocks. Social network structure for each observation session in experiment 2. Lines represent directed singing interactions. Letters/numbers beside nodes represent individual identity, (females: squares males: circles). Vertical spacing of males represents relative dominance rank based on male-directed singing ratio. Numbers beside males in parentheses represent change in dominance rank from the observation session before the one shown. Thickness of the line represents number of songs sung (largest line = 208 songs [aviary 2, lesioned introduction, M1 to A], smallest = 5 songs [multiple instances]). Arrows represent direction of singing interaction. Credit: PLoS ONE 8(5): e63239. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0063239

Female cowbirds incapable of recognizing high-quality male songs can alter the behavior of flock-mates of either sex and disrupt overall social structure, according to research published May 1 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Maguire and colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania.

Individual traits can impact a social network even in cowbirds, but the impact of changing individual behavior on the group as a whole can be difficult to elucidate. Here, the researchers inactivated female responsible for identifying high-quality mating songs. Though they did not record significant changes in the behavior of these birds individually, these 'tone-deaf' females had surprisingly strong effects on group dynamics in a mixed flock. with these regions inactivated received from more males than normal females.

As a result, males in the group changed their dominance status and courtship patterns, and the competitive behaviors of other females in the group were also affected. Aspects of behavior traditionally thought to be under male control, such as pair-bonding and mate guarding, were also influenced by the presence of these female birds in the flock. According to the authors, their results highlight the interconnected nature of an individual and its social environment, where neural systems which determine individual behavior can have a significant impact on social behaviors of the species.

Maguire adds, "This work is the first to experimentally probe the structure of social networks by determining how individual circuits and behavior interact to form group stability."

Explore further: Rising temperatures can be hard on dogs

More information: Maguire SE, Schmidt MF, White DJ (2013) Social Brains in Context: Lesions Targeted to the Song Control System in Female Cowbirds Affect Their Social Network. PLoS ONE 8(5): e63239. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0063239

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Female cowbirds prefer less intense male courtship displays

May 03, 2012

In most species, females prefer the most intense courtship display males can muster, but a new study finds that female cowbirds actually prefer less intense displays. The full results are published May 2 in the open access ...

Vision stimulates courtship calls in the grey tree frog

Nov 19, 2012

Male tree frogs like to 'see what they're getting' when they select females for mating, according to a new study by Dr. Michael Reichert from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the US. His work, which is one of the ...

Dating drought or purple patch? How males choose mates

Oct 11, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Males decide how much effort they put into courtship and which females to court based on how many others they have recently encountered and how attractive they were, according to a new study into the mating ...

Recommended for you

Rising temperatures can be hard on dogs

Jul 25, 2014

The "dog days of summer" are here, but don't let the phrase fool you. This hot time of year can be dangerous for your pup, says a Kansas State University veterinarian.

Monkeys fear big cats less, eat more, with humans around

Jul 25, 2014

Some Monkeys in South Africa have been found to regard field scientists as human shields against predators and why not if the alternative is death by leopard? The researchers found the monkeys felt far safer ...

User comments : 0