Tesla Model S gets Consumer Reports' top score

May 09, 2013 by Tom Krisher
Tesla S
Tesla S

The Tesla Motors Inc. Model S electric car has tied an older Lexus for the highest score ever recorded in Consumer Reports magazine's automotive testing.

The Model S, which starts at $62,400 after a , scored 99 points on a scale of 100 in the magazine's battery of tests.

"It accelerates, handles and brakes like a sports car. It has the ride and quietness of a luxury car and is far more energy-efficient than the best hybrid cars," Jake Fisher, the magazine's director of automotive testing, said Thursday in a statement.

The magazine tested a Model S that cost $89,650 and was equipped with an 85 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery that's larger than the standard battery. The car went from zero to 60 mph (100 kph) in only 5.6 seconds. The magazine said it handled like a Porsche sports car, yet it was the quietest car it had tested since the Lexus LS. The interior, the magazine said, was beautifully crafted and reminded testers of an Audi.

found that the Model S had a range of about 180 miles (290 kilometers) on cold winter days and 225 miles (362 kilometers) in moderate temperatures, far higher than other pure that go 75 or 80 miles (120 or 130 kilometers) on a single charge. Tesla says the 85 kwh battery-car can go 300 miles (480 kilometers) at 55 mph (88 kph).

In this June 22, 2012 file photo, Tesla workers cheer on the first Tesla Model S cars sold during a rally at the Tesla factory in Fremont, Calif. The Tesla Motors Inc. Model S electric car has tied an older Lexus for the highest score ever recorded in Consumer Reports magazine's automotive testing on Thursday, May 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

Charging the Model S costs about $9 at the national average of 11 cents per kilowatt-hour, the magazine said, making the car equal to running a conventional vehicle on gasoline that costs $1.20 per gallon (3.8 liters), Consumer Reports said. The magazine calculated that the Model S got the gasoline equivalent of 84 miles per gallon (36 kilometers per liter).

The Model S, though, didn't get Consumer Reports' coveted "Recommended Buy" rating because the magazine doesn't have sufficient data to judge reliability of the car, which went on sale last year.

The car was not without shortcomings. Consumer Reports said its drawbacks include limited range, long charging times and coupe-like styling that hinders rear visibility and crimps passenger access. The magazine also was concerned about buying a from a startup company with no track record of reliability or resale value and a "skimpy (although growing) service network."

The Model S tied a Lexus 460L full-size tested in 2007 for the record score.

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antialias_physorg
3.3 / 5 (8) May 09, 2013
The car was not without shortcomings. Consumer Reports said its drawbacks include limited range


Even though I love - cars I can't help but find it funny that an article that starts with...
The Model S, which starts at $62,400 after a federal tax credit, scored 99 points on a scale of 100 in the magazine's battery of tests.
...that it's then the test of the battery that costs it a point.
210
2 / 5 (4) May 09, 2013
Wha? Hold on a minute...:...Consumer Reports said its drawbacks include limited range, long charging times and coupe-like styling that hinders rear visibility and crimps passenger access. The magazine also was concerned about buying a car from a startup company with no track record of reliability or resale value and a "skimpy (although growing) service network."

Read more at: http://phys.org/n...#jCp..."

Perhaps this SERIES of drawbacks including some battery-related technology issues cost it the point, but certainly not just the battery. They did use a nonstandard battery in the tests but that could not have been a real minus.
Perhaps you saw something else?

word-
VENDItardE
1 / 5 (12) May 09, 2013
total BS written by an idiot (or a greenie)
djr
4.2 / 5 (10) May 09, 2013
"total BS written by an idiot (or a greenie)"

Another substantive comment to bolster our understanding of the subject matter at hand from the peanut gallery. You too must have been talking to NotParker - do I sense a pattern?
PoppaJ
3.7 / 5 (3) May 09, 2013
I have watched a Tesla roadster perform at our local SRRSCCA autocross events on a consistent basis. You can see it on Facebook. I would say that seeing first hand the nature of electric performance I really have to wonder why more time and effort hasn't been put into this. The vehicle consistently outperforms some of the best competitors. I dream of the day when my race car is electric. The fact that this article gave it a 99 out 100 shows that we have come along way only recently. What kinds of marks have other all electric vehicles been given? If we step outside the box and analyze this article for what it is, we all would be excited for what the future holds.
Telekinetic
1 / 5 (4) May 09, 2013
"...we all would be excited for what the future holds."- p.j.

But first a nod to the past is in order-
" French inventor Gustave Trouvé demonstrated a working three-wheeled automobile at the International Exhibition of Electricity in Paris. English inventor Thomas Parker, who was responsible for innovations such as electrifying the London Underground, overhead tramways in Liverpool and Birmingham, and the smokeless fuel coalite, claimed to have perfected a working electric car as early as 1884.The first four-wheeled electric car was built by the German engineer Andreas Flocken in 1888."
Eikka
1 / 5 (5) May 10, 2013
This is like the Doble company steam car a hundred years ago - superb performance, luxurious, seems like the future of automobiles... but it's just too expensive and limited by its very technology.

Meanwhile, fuel cell vehicles using natural gas and synthetic methane come out of the left field and replace battery electric vehicles as the people's choice for green transportation.
CapitalismPrevails
1 / 5 (9) May 10, 2013
How much did Tesla bribe Consumer Reports for a favorable rating i wonder? Consumer Reports has been slowly but surely losing its reputation over the years with its reviews on green products.
djr
4.2 / 5 (10) May 10, 2013
Consumer Reports has been slowly but surely losing its reputation over the years with its reviews on green products.

The AGW scientists must have gotten to them - threatened them with not being published in peer reviewed journals if they don't tow the line - this conspiracy goes deep (sarcasm).

Meanwhile back at the farm - Tesla is blowing away expectations and making money the old fashioned way - they are earning it. http://green.auto...ling-ev/
topkill
4 / 5 (4) May 11, 2013
And once again, eikka gets sexually aroused by saying stupid shyte about electric vehicles. Clearly his mother beat him with an electric toy every time he was caught masturbating.
Newbeak
not rated yet May 12, 2013
Would it make sense to lease the battery to buyers? That would make the car a hell of a lot more attractive to potential buyers.BTW,it is drop dead gorgeous!
italba
1 / 5 (3) May 13, 2013
@Eikka: Methane fuel cells do exists, but have some serious drawback. They need a high temperature gas reformer device that generate hydrogen for the fuel cell and some CO2 too, methane must be stored in heavy high pressure gas bottle. A better solution would be a direct methanol fuel cell, but the technology for these cells is far from perfect by now. Anyway, you can't use a fuel cell without a good battery.
antialias_physorg
2.3 / 5 (3) May 13, 2013
Would it make sense to lease the battery to buyers?

Yes. That is the current business model for the Smart Electric Drive from Mercedes.
This does bring down the price considerably (I think it's 19000 EUR or thereabouts - still nearly double of the regular Smart which doesn't have the range drawback).

Unfortunately still too expensive for the (lack of) range it affords. For the 10k difference you can buy gas for 100k km (and while charging up on electricity is vastly cheaper it's not free).
Newbeak
not rated yet May 13, 2013

Unfortunately still too expensive for the (lack of) range it affords. For the 10k difference you can buy gas for 100k km (and while charging up on electricity is vastly cheaper it's not free).


Yeah,but it has more than enough range for most people.Did you read the CU comments on it's range (~ 200 miles with the 85kwh battery)? The Smart only seats two,and this car seats 5.In the words of CU,"With its hefty 85-kWh lithium-ion battery, our Tesla is easily the most practical electric car we've tested". Add a leased battery,and they will be selling like hotcakes.
Newbeak
not rated yet May 13, 2013
Would it make sense to lease the battery to buyers?

Yes. That is the current business model for the Smart Electric Drive from Mercedes.
This does bring down the price considerably (I think it's 19000 EUR or thereabouts - still nearly double of the regular Smart which doesn't have the range drawback).

Unfortunately still too expensive for the (lack of) range it affords. For the 10k difference you can buy gas for 100k km (and while charging up on electricity is vastly cheaper it's not free).

Have you seen this CNN report? http://money.cnn....pt=hp_t2

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