Space not the final frontier for viewing movies

May 15, 2013 by Seth Borenstein
This undated publicity film image released by Paramount Pictures shows, Zachary Quinto, left, as Spock and Chris Pine as Kirk in a scene in the movie, "Star Trek Into Darkness," from Paramount Pictures and Skydance Productions. The three astronauts in the International Space Station were offered a sneak peak of the movie days before it opens Thursday, May 16, 2013 on Earth. (AP Photo/Paramount Pictures, Zade Rosenthal)

The crew of the International Space Station is boldly going where no one has gone before—to see the new "Star Trek" film.

The three astronauts were offered a sneak peak of " Into Darkness" days before it opens Thursday on Earth, seeing it not in 3-D, but Zero-G.

NASA spokesman Kelly Humphries said the movie was beamed up to the outpost Monday and the two Russians and American on board had a day off Tuesday. That gave them a chance to view it on their laptops. It's unclear if they watched it.

U.S. astronaut Chris Cassidy is taking part Thursday in a + hangout that's bringing together two Earth-bound astronauts, the stars of the film Chris Pine, Alice Eve and John Cho, and its director and screenwriter.

Explore further: Captain's log: real space chat for Star Trek crew

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