Slooh Space Camera to broadcast live feed of recent lunar impact site

May 21, 2013

Two months ago, on March 17th, 2013, a small space rock weighing just 88 pounds (40kg), travelling at 56,000 miles per hour, smashed into the lunar surface creating a flash so bright that viewers looking at the Moon at the moment of impact could have seen the explosion.

Slooh will broadcast a free, realtime feed of the lunar impact site at Mare Imbrium on Wednesday, May 22nd starting at 6:00 PM PDT / 9:00 PM EDT / 01:00 UTC (May 23) additional times here: http://goo.gl/IT5sR with observatory feeds from their world class observatory site in off the coast of . Viewers can watch live on their PC/MAC or by downloading the free Slooh iPad app in the iTunes store and touching the broadcast icon.

The Slooh broadcast team will provide live commentary along with Bob Berman, author of numerous astronomy books and contributing editor and monthly columnist for Astronomy Magazine. The panel will discuss this violent event in the context of the recent flurry of NearEarth Objects that have narrowly missed our planet, as well as the meteor of February 15 that exploded in the atmosphere over Siberia.

This is an unprecedented, firsttimeever event," says astronomer Bob Berman. "Apparently, a number of brilliant fireballs tore through Earth's atmosphere just as the received a visible impact bright enough to create a onesecond
point of light, seen by anyone watching the Moon at that moment. This suggests that a fairly dense swarm of meteoroids zipped through our orbit at that time, two months ago"

The newlycreated crater's size is estimated as 197 feet (60 meters) large enough to swallow a house.

While researchers continue to investigate the event, Slooh will make best efforts to detect the new crater for viewers, if it exists, as they will take advantage of the Moon's optimum lighting at the Mare Imbrium site on Wednesday night to view the impact region.

Explore further: Bright explosion on the Moon

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