Scotland to deploy largest hydro-electric wave energy farm to date (w/ video)

May 23, 2013 by Bob Yirka report

(Phys.org) —Fergus Ewing, Scotland's energy minister, has announced plans for the deployment of 40 to 50 Oyster hydro-electric wave devices off the country's northwestern shore. The new facility will be capable of producing 40MW of electricity, which should be enough to power approximately 30,000 homes—making it the largest such facility in the world.

To generate electricity from the project will utilize two separate mechanisms. The first is the —a device that uses to pump water to the second part of the system, a hydro-electric station—it converts the water pumped to it to electricity. The Oyster device sits just offshore (it's bolted to the ) in water 10 to 12 meters deep. In essence it's a large buoyant flap that is pushed back and forth by wave action—that motion is used to drive hydraulic pistons that push the water ashore. The Oyster is big, weighing in at roughly 200 tons—the flap alone is roughly 18 by 12 by 4 meters in size. Each Oyster device is capable of pushing enough water to the onshore station to produce 315kW of electricity. During , just 2 meters of the top of the flap can be seen. To produce large amounts of electricity, multiple Oyster devices will be deployed, all connected to the same hydro-electric station.

A company called Aquamarine Power will build the Oyster devices, some of which have already been successfully tested at another location in Scotland. The only hold up, a company rep told the press, was the timetable for installation of the which is to distribute the electricity from the hydro-electric station to the grid. It will be put in place by European energy giant SSE which announced separately that they wouldn't be able to finish laying the cable for the system until 2017. For that reason, the project overall isn't expected to go online until sometime 2018.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

During the announcement, Ewing noted that Scotland is uniquely situated to take advantage of wave energy, noting the country offers 10 percent of Europe's total wave power potential. The total expected cost of the project has not been announced, but money to pay for the new system will come from the government's £18 million Marine Renewables Commercialization Fund.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
Aquamarine Power - Oyster 800 wave energy converter in action


Explore further: Website shines light on renewable energy resources

More information: www.aquamarinepower.com/projec… -800-project-orkney/

Related Stories

Ocean mavericks in Maine turn tide for electrical grid

Sep 19, 2012

(Phys.org)—Sadly speaking, the U.S. ocean-energy industry has had to take a back seat to Europe, where government subsidies help entrepreneurs and innovative companies work on their technologies. Happily ...

A storage power plant on the seabed

May 16, 2013

Norwegian research scientists will contribute to realising the concept of storing electricity at the bottom of the sea. The energy will be stored with the help of high water pressure.

Goldman Sachs to invest in Japan green energy

May 20, 2013

US investment banking giant Goldman Sachs said Monday it will start investing in Japanese renewable energy projects, with a reported $2.9 billion outlay over the next five years.

Recommended for you

The state of shale

17 hours ago

University of Pittsburgh researchers have shared their findings from three studies related to shale gas in a recent special issue of the journal Energy Technology, edited by Götz Veser, the Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor of Che ...

Website shines light on renewable energy resources

Dec 18, 2014

A team from the University of Arizona and eight southwestern electric utility companies have built a pioneering web portal that provides insight into renewable energy sources and how they contribute to the ...

Better software cuts computer energy use

Dec 18, 2014

An EU research project is developing tools to help software engineers create energy-efficient code, which could reduce electricity consumption at data centres by up to 50% and improve battery life in smart ...

Cook farm waste into energy

Dec 17, 2014

It takes some cooking, but turning farm waste into biofuels is now possible and makes economic sense, according to preliminary research from the University of Guelph.

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Shootist
1 / 5 (4) May 23, 2013
Scotland, and the rest of Great Britain, might be better off arming her citizens to fight Muslim extremists.
VendicarE
1 / 5 (3) May 24, 2013
Extremist Muslims would be better off decapitating Conservative Extremists like ShooTard.

There is a price to be paid for supporting the War Crimes committed by George Bush and America.

In fact... Justice demands it.
kochevnik
2 / 5 (4) May 24, 2013
Abraham's children are feral bastards who couldn't dream up a wave generator even if god gave them the schematics

"Violence does solve problems" - christian FBI contractors
anneeq
not rated yet May 25, 2013
Some real idiotic comments on here. FYI Some of THE greatest scientists of the past had deep religious convictions and came up with the greatest discoveries of all time, namely Sir Isaac Newton and Ibn Khaldun with their research on gravity and laws of motion. Their passion for exploring Allah or God's Universe is what drove them to devote large parts of their lives to scientific research. Scientific advances can be understood and appreciatedwithout ideological mudslinging....

To get back to the actual article tho, im surprised this really hasnt been THE big thing. The potential is so great and it is far more efficient than windfarms yet its the latter that everyone's investing so much into.....

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.