Scientists sound alarm at Arctic Ocean's rapid acidification

May 06, 2013
A picture taken on September 3, 2010 from NASA's Aqua satellite shows the Arctic sea ice. Scientists expressed alarm on Monday over the rapid acidification of the Arctic Ocean caused by carbon dioxide emissions, which could have dire consequences on the region's fragile ecosystem.

Scientists expressed alarm on Monday over the rapid acidification of the Arctic Ocean caused by carbon dioxide emissions, which could have dire consequences on the region's fragile ecosystem.

Acidity levels in the planet's oceans have risen by 30 percent since the start of the industrial era, and are now at their highest levels in at least 55 million years, delegates said at a conference in Bergen, Norway dedicated to the subject.

The is more vulnerable than other oceans because its cold waters absorb more carbon dioxide. It is also fed by fresh water from rivers and melting ice, which makes it less able chemically to neutralise the effects of the carbon dioxide.

Furthermore, the increase in exposes greater expanses of water, which leads to greater absorption.

In the Iceland and Barents seas, have decreased by around 0.02 per decade since the end of the 1960s.

Even if were to be brought to a halt today, it would take tens of thousands of years for the oceans to return to the they had before the industrial era began two centuries ago, according to Norwegian researcher Richard Bellerby, the main author of a scientific study on the subject.

A little-known phenomenon that is spread unevenly in bodies of water, including in the Arctic, acidification poses a threat to corals, mollusks and other shell organisms such as pteropods, also known as sea angels and sea butterflies, whose ability to calcify has been altered.

Some species, such as the brittle star which is similar to a starfish, face a direct risk of extinction, and may also be affected.

As a result, industrial fishing, tourism and the lifestyles of indigenous peoples are at stake.

However, other species could benefit from the rising acidification, scientists said.

"Uncertainty is not an excuse for inaction," said Sam Dupont of Sweden's Gothenburg University.

Scientists called for politicians to once again put climate change at the top of the political agenda, regretting that the issue had been overshadowed by the economic crisis.

"We have to think beyond this bank crisis," said Carol Turley of the Plymouth Marine Laboratory in Britain.

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User comments : 8

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_anni_lexander21
2.5 / 5 (11) May 06, 2013
PH IS DETERMINED LOGARITHMIC, NOT LINEARLY....
YOU CALL YOURSELVES "SCIENTISTS"??

A 30% INCREASE IN H+ IONS IS NOT A 30% DECREASE IN PH !!!

""" Between 1751 and 1994 surface ocean pH is estimated to have decreased from approximately 8.25 to 8.14,[4] representing an increase of almost 30% in H+ ion concentration in the world's oceans """" WIkipedia
antigoracle
May 06, 2013
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
_anni_lexander21
2.3 / 5 (15) May 06, 2013
"Uncertainty is not an excuse for inaction," said Sam Dupont of Sweden's Gothenburg University."""

WHAT? UNCERTAINTY IS THE BEST REASON NOT TO TAKE ACTION...

George Orwell is turning in his grave, Science has become make believe propaganda tailored to sell whatever Malthusian Political agenda the Bankers see fit!!
deepsand
2.7 / 5 (12) May 07, 2013
"Uncertainty is not an excuse for inaction," said Sam Dupont of Sweden's Gothenburg University.

But stupidity, deceit and greed for the research funding, certainly is.

As a practitioner of stupidity and deceit, who better to know than you.
antigoracle
May 07, 2013
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
deepsand
2.5 / 5 (13) May 08, 2013
And AO's post is his usual patently offensive verbiage.

The sad fact is that argumentum ad hominem is the best he can muster, as he has absolutely no grasp of the Science involved.
The Alchemist
1 / 5 (9) May 08, 2013
Now this is actually interesting... I see idiotic proposals for burying CO2, which would cost and do nothing (think about it).
Yet changing the acidity of the ocean is a reasonable, if huge proposal, so as long as we're whistling dixie: It is very easy to change the pH near neutrality. The evil forces of carbonate are nothing compared to the evil forces of say, lye...
Not that I'm advocating understand. But maybe we could conceive of a strong environmentally friendly base... CaO? Ca(OH)2, tribasic Ammonium Phosphate?
Nah, let's just bury our CO2, like another article suggests, makes much more sense (sarcasm alert).
antigoracle
1.3 / 5 (12) May 08, 2013
And AO's post is his usual patently offensive verbiage.

The sad fact is that argumentum ad hominem is the best he can muster, as he has absolutely no grasp of the Science involved.

So TURD STOOLS do come in clusters and are obviously loved by the Cult.
deepsand
2.7 / 5 (14) May 09, 2013
AO's post is his usual patently offensive verbiage.

The sad fact is that argumentum ad hominem is the best he can muster, as he has absolutely no grasp of the Science involved.
Howhot
4 / 5 (8) May 10, 2013
From the articlel
Scientists expressed alarm on Monday over the rapid acidification of the Arctic Ocean caused by carbon dioxide emissions, which could have dire consequences on the region's fragile ecosystem.


WOW. Yeah, given the water temperatures, solubility of CO2 and it's preference for cold water, I can defiantly see how there could be an acidification problem.

I guess that is just another in a long chain of concerns that Deniers need not worry about because according to them, this is just cheap junk Al-Gore non-sense.

Isn't that true oh mighty @Anti whose orifices contract and expand on will?

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