Protesters across globe rally against Monsanto

May 26, 2013
People carry signs during a protest against Monsanto in Montpelier, Vt. on Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. Protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. Monsanto Co., based in St. Louis, said Saturday its seeds improve agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving resources such as water and energy. (AP Photo/Mark Collier)

Protesters rallied in dozens of cities Saturday as part of a global protest against seed giant Monsanto and the genetically modified food it produces, organizers said.

Organizers said "March Against Monsanto" protests were held in 52 countries and 436 cities, including Los Angeles where demonstrators waved signs that read "Real Food 4 Real People" and "Label GMOs, It's Our Right to Know."

Protesters gathered in Buenos Aires and other cities in Argentina, where Monsanto's genetically modified soy and now command nearly 100 percent of the market, and the company's Roundup-Ready chemicals are sprayed throughout the year on fields where cows once grazed. They carried signs saying "Monsanto-Get out of ."

Genetically modified plants are grown from seeds that are engineered to resist and , add nutritional benefits or otherwise improve and increase the .

Most corn, and grown in the United States today have been genetically modified. But critics say genetically modified organisms can lead to serious and harm the environment. The use of GMOs has been a growing issue of contention in recent years, with health advocates pushing for mandatory labeling of genetically modified products even though the federal government and many scientists say the technology is safe.

The 'March Against Monsanto' movement began just a few months ago, when founder and organizer Tami Canal created a Facebook page on Feb. 28 calling for a rally against the company's practices.

Demonstrators hold signs reading in Spanish "Glyphosate = illness, disability, death," left, "Genocide concealed by agrochemicals in Argentina," second from left, and "Get out Monsanto from Argentina" near the offices of the U.S.-based company Monsanto in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, May 25, 2013. Activists are taking part in a global protest "March Against Monsanto" against the seed giant, demanding a stop to the use of agrochemicals and the production of genetically modified food. Protesters say genetically modified organisms can lead to serious health conditions and harm the environment. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

"If I had gotten 3,000 people to join me, I would have considered that a success," she said Saturday. Instead, she said an "incredible" number of people responded to her message and turned out to rally.

"It was empowering and inspiring to see so many people, from different walks of life, put aside their differences and come together today," Canal said. The group plans to harness the success of the event to continue its anti-GMO cause.

"We will continue until Monsanto complies with consumer demand. They are poisoning our children, poisoning our planet," she said. "If we don't act, who's going to?"

Monsanto Co., based in St. Louis, said that it respects people's rights to express their opinion on the topic, but maintains that its seeds improve agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving resources such as water and energy.

The Food and Drug Administration does not require genetically modified foods to carry a label, but organic food companies and some consumer groups have intensified their push for labels, arguing that the modified seeds are floating from field to field and contaminating traditional crops. The groups have been bolstered by a growing network of consumers who are wary of processed and modified foods.

The U.S. Senate this week overwhelmingly rejected a bill that would allow states to require labeling of genetically modified foods.

People chant and carry signs during a protest against Monsanto in front of the capitol building in Montpelier, Vt. on Saturday, May 25, 2013. Marches and rallies against seed giant Monsanto were held across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries Saturday. Protesters say they want to call attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the food giants that produce it. Monsanto Co., based in St. Louis, said Saturday its seeds improve agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving resources such as water and energy. (AP Photo/Mark Collier)

The Biotechnology Industry Organization, a lobbying group that represents Monsanto, DuPont & Co. and other makers of genetically modified seeds, has said that it supports voluntary labeling for people who seek out such products. But it says that mandatory labeling would only mislead or confuse consumers into thinking the products aren't safe, even though the FDA has said there's no difference between GMO and organic, non-GMO foods.

However, state legislatures in Vermont and Connecticut moved ahead this month with votes to make food companies declare genetically modified ingredients on their packages. And supermarket retailer Whole Foods Markets Inc. has said that all products in its North American stores that contain ingredients will be labeled as such by 2018.

Whole Foods says there is growing demand for products that don't use GMOs, with sales of products with a "Non-GMO" verification label spiking between 15 percent and 30 percent.

Explore further: Peripheral clocks don't need the brain's master clock to function correctly

More information: www.march-against-monsanto.com/p/blog-page.html
www.facebook.com/MarchAgainstMonsanto
www.monsanto.com

5 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Monsanto, DuPont end fight over GMO seeds

Mar 27, 2013

Agribusiness giants DuPont and Monsanto ended a legal fight Tuesday over rights to genetically modified seeds, with DuPont agreeing to pay Monsanto licensing fees for its seed technology.

EU asks citizens to join debate on GM food

Jan 15, 2013

The European Union on Tuesday took the debate about genetically modified crops to the public with a survey asking citizens to share their thoughts on organic farming.

Monsanto profit rises 22 percent in second quarter

Apr 03, 2013

(AP)—Monsanto reported Wednesday that its income increased 22 percent in the agriculture products company's second quarter on strong sales of biotech seeds, particularly in Brazil and other emerging markets.

US initiative will test appetite for GMO food

Oct 06, 2012

(AP)—Calories. Nutrients. Serving size. How about "produced with genetic engineering?" California voters will soon decide whether to require certain raw and processed foods to carry such a label.

Recommended for you

Identifying the source of stem cells

17 hours ago

When most animals begin life, cells immediately begin accepting assignments to become a head, tail or a vital organ. However, mammals, including humans, are special. The cells of mammalian embryos get to ...

Contamination likely explains 'food genes in blood' claim

Oct 29, 2014

Laboratory contaminants likely explain the results of a recent study claiming that complete genes can pass from foods we eat into our blood, according to a University of Michigan molecular biologist who re-examined ...

User comments : 5

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

geokstr
1 / 5 (1) May 27, 2013
Yes, look at those huge crowds this issue has attracted!

I have to take at least one shoe off to be able to count the giant throng of protesters in every one of these pictures.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet May 27, 2013
You must have quite a number of toes...the official count overall is 2 milion protesters...whereas the organizers said they had hoped for 3000.

And it's about damn time someone stood up to Monsanto. It doesn't even have to be a ban on GM foods - but at the very least it should be labeled as such so that the consumer can make an infomed choice. That doesn't seem like an unreasonable demand.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (1) May 28, 2013
How Genetically Modified Foods Could Affect Our Health in Unexpected Ways Chinese researchers have found small pieces of rice ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the blood and organs of humans who eat rice. The Nanjing University-based team showed that this genetic material will bind to receptors in human liver cells and influence the uptake of cholesterol from the blood.

Many animals aren't so silly and they can recognize GMO corn and they avoid it in food. Why?
Because in reality, the contemporary genetic manipulations aren't well defined chemical reactions, which you may expect from school lab experiments. They usually produce metabolic mess and mixture of proteins, many of them are unknown in the nature. Some of them are causing allergies, but many others have no apparent effect. The animals recognize some of them by their smell, but people aren't so sensitive about it
Guy_Underbridge
not rated yet May 28, 2013
"Genetically modified plants are grown from seeds that are engineered to resist insecticides and herbicides..."

What we need are genetically modified humans are engineered to resist insecticides and herbicides...
Anorion
1 / 5 (1) May 28, 2013
monsanto , the devil's business division in this world

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.