NASA sees two tropical cyclones competing in the Indian Ocean

May 10, 2013
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone Jamala in the southern Indian Ocean (bottom) and the much larger Tropical Cyclone One B (01B) in the Northern Indian Ocean on May 10 at 04:25 UTC (12:25 a.m. EDT). Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

The Indian Ocean is alive with tropical activity today, May 10, as there's a tropical storm in both the northern and southern oceans. Tropical Cyclone Jamala (formerly 24S) and newborn Tropical Cyclone 01B were both captured on one image from NASA's Terra satellite today.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's captured this visible image of compact Tropical Cyclone Jamala in the southern Indian and the much larger Tropical Cyclone One B (01B) in the Northern Indian Ocean on May 10 at 04:25 UTC (12:25 a.m. EDT).

On May 10 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tropical Cyclone Jamala (formerly Cyclone 24S) had near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). It was centered near 8.7 south latitude and 86.2 east longitude, about 805 nautical miles (926.4 miles/1,491 km) east of Diego Garcia. Jamala is crawling to the south-southeast at 3 knots (3.4 mph/5.5 kph). Forecasters at the Joint expect Jamala to shift westward in movement and intensify up to hurricane strength.

A different look at Tropical Cyclone Jamala, using multi-spectral satellite imagery revealed a partially-exposed low-level circulation center and a large area of deep convection displaced over the western side of the storm.

North of the equator in the Northern Indian Ocean, newborn Tropical Cyclone 01B developed from low pressure System 92B. 01B formed near the northern tip of Sumatra. On May 10 at 0900 UTC Tropical Cyclone 01B had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40.2 mph/64.8 kph). It was located 1,052 nautical miles (1,211 miles/1,948 km) south of Chittagong, India, centered near 4.8 north latitude and 93.6 east longitude. Tropical Cyclone 01B was moving to the northeast at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph) and is forecast to move northwest into the central .

Multi-spectral shows that the fragmented bands of thunderstorms that were seen yesterday, May 9, have now solidified, strengthened and have become tightly wrapped around 01B's center.

Residents of northwestern Burma and eastern Bangladesh should keep a watch on Tropical Cyclone 01B. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect 01B to intensify into hurricane force and make landfall on May 14 or 15 in northwestern Burma and eastern Bangladesh.

Explore further: Famine in the Horn of Africa (1984) was caused by El Niño and currents in the Indian Ocean

Related Stories

NASA satellite imagery shows Cyclone Imelda one-sided

Apr 12, 2013

An upper-level low pressure system is sapping the cloud and thunderstorm development on the western side of Cyclone Victoria in the Southern Indian Ocean. New NASA satellite imagery showed that the bulk of ...

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 15S form in So. Indian Ocean

Feb 11, 2013

The fifteenth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season strengthened into a tropical storm today, Feb. 11, and NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead hours after it reached tropical storm strength.

NASA sees Cyclone Victoria developing an eye

Apr 11, 2013

Cyclone Victoria continued to intensify overnight from April 9 to April 10, and imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a tighter storm circulation and a possible eye developing.

NASA imagery shows wind shear hammering Cyclone Imelda

Apr 16, 2013

Cyclone Imelda has lost both her punch and her hurricane status as the storm moved into an area of higher wind shear and cooler waters in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an image ...

Recommended for you

Image: Towing the Costa Concordia

14 minutes ago

This Sentinel-1A image was acquired on 26 July 2014 over the coast of northwestern Italy while the Costa Concordia cruise ship (enlarged) was being towed towards the city of Genoa.

NASA sees zombie Tropical Depression Genevieve reborn

17 hours ago

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm that the remnant low pressure area of former Tropical Storm Genevieve has become a Zombie storm, and has been reborn as a tropical depression on ...

Wave energy impact on harbour operations investigated

21 hours ago

Infragravity period oscillations—waves that occur between 25 and 300 seconds with a wavelength between 100m and 10km—can have an impact on berthing operations, depending on a harbour's geometry.

User comments : 0