Mathematicians help to unlock brain function

May 02, 2013
Mathematicians help to unlock brain function

(Phys.org) —Mathematicians from Queen Mary, University of London will bring researchers one-step closer to understanding how the structure of the brain relates to its function in two recently published studies.

Publishing in Physical Review Letters the researchers from the group at Queen Mary's School of Mathematical Sciences describe how different areas in the brain can have an association despite a lack of direct interaction.

The team, in collaboration with researchers in Barcelona, Pamplona and Paris, combined two different human brain networks - one that maps all the physical connections among known as the backbone network, and another that reports the activity of different regions as blood flow changes, known as the functional network. They showed that the presence of symmetrical neurons within the backbone network might be responsible for the synchronised activity of physically distant .

Lead author Vincenzo Nicosia, said "We don't fully understand how the works. So far the focus has been more on the analysis of the function of single, localised regions. However, there isn't a complete model that brings the whole functionality of the brain together. Hopefully, our research will help neuroscientists to develop a more accurate map of the brain and investigate its functioning beyond single areas."

The research adds to the recent findings published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in which the QM researchers along with the Department of Psychiatry at University of Cambridge analysed the development of the brain of a small worm called Caenorhabditis elegans. In this paper, the team examined the number of links formed in the brain during the worm's lifespan, and observed an unexpected in the pattern of growth, corresponding with the time of egg hatching.

"The research is important as it's the first time that a sharp transition in the growth of a neural network has ever been observed," added Dr Nicosia.

"Although we don't know which biological factors are responsible for the change in the growth pattern, we were able to reproduce the pattern using a simple economical model of synaptic formation. This result can pave the way to a deeper understanding of how neural networks grow in more complex organisms."

Explore further: The unifying framework of symmetry reveals properties of a broad range of physical systems

Related Stories

Wiring the brain

Apr 13, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- Researchers at the University of Cambridge have developed a simple mathematical model of the brain which provides a remarkably complete statistical account of the complex web of connections ...

What does Twitter have to do with the human brain?

Mar 11, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- We like to think the human brain is special, something different from other brains and information processing systems, but a Cambridge professor is set to test that assumption – by conducting ...

Recommended for you

What time is it in the universe?

19 hours ago

Flavor Flav knows what time it is. At least he does for Flavor Flav. Even with all his moving and accelerating, with the planet, the solar system, getting on planes, taking elevators, and perhaps even some ...

Watching the structure of glass under pressure

Aug 28, 2014

Glass has many applications that call for different properties, such as resistance to thermal shock or to chemically harsh environments. Glassmakers commonly use additives such as boron oxide to tweak these ...

Inter-dependent networks stress test

Aug 28, 2014

Energy production systems are good examples of complex systems. Their infrastructure equipment requires ancillary sub-systems structured like a network—including water for cooling, transport to supply fuel, and ICT systems ...

Explainer: How does our sun shine?

Aug 28, 2014

What makes our sun shine has been a mystery for most of human history. Given our sun is a star and stars are suns, explaining the source of the sun's energy would help us understand why stars shine. ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

beleg
1 / 5 (2) May 05, 2013
Structure vs. function typifies all of science.
And scale makes or breaks consistency between the two.

Differential geometry vs. Functional analysis.
(Relativity vs. Quantum Mechanics)

Even in 'science' where 'structure' has no physical meaning (math) you have attempts to de-emphasize the riff the word "versus" brings forth:
Applied Mathematics vs. Pure Mathematics.

This tradition continues on into science:
Theoretical vs. Experimental activity.

And in the end you even have:
"Thought experiments"
- to downplay the riff "versus" brings forth between structure and function.
beleg
1 / 5 (2) May 05, 2013
The greatest of all human endeavors to rid ourselves of the word "versus" between the words "structure" and " function" is called Lie theory.

Lie theory lies at the heart of human longing to see structure and function as one on any scale.