Iron-platinum alloys could be new-generation hard drives

May 20, 2013
These atomic force microscope images show how adding copper to an alloy of iron and platinum changes the crystal structure and magnetic properties, important for data storage. Credit: Kai Liu, UC Davis

Meeting the demand for more data storage in smaller volumes means using materials made up of ever-smaller magnets, or nanomagnets. One promising material for a potential new generation of recording media is an alloy of iron and platinum with an ordered crystal structure. Researchers led by Professor Kai Liu and graduate student Dustin Gilbert at the University of California, Davis, have now found a convenient way to make these alloys and tailor their properties.

"The relatively convenient synthesis conditions, along with the tunable magnetic properties, make these materials highly desirable for future technologies," said Liu, a professor of physics. The iron-platinum alloy has the ability to retain information even at extremely small nanomagnet sizes, and it is resistant to heat effects.

Previous methods for making the iron-platinum alloys with an ordered crystal structure involved high-temperature treatments that would be difficult to integrate into the rest of the manufacturing process, Liu said.

The researchers, including Liang-Wei Wang and Chih-Huang Lai of the National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan, and Timothy Klemmer and Jan-Ulrich Thiele, of Seagate Technologies in Fremont, used a method called atomic-scale multilayer sputtering to create a material with extremely thin layers of metal, and rapid thermal annealing to convert it into the desirable ordered alloy. They were able to adjust the of the alloy by adding small amounts of copper into particular regions of the alloy.

A paper describing the work was recently published in the journal Applied Physics Letters and featured in its Research Highlights.

Explore further: NC State breakthrough results in super-hard nanocrystalline iron that can take the heat

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EyeNStein
2 / 5 (4) May 20, 2013
Great finesse in alloy creation, but lacking the usual figures like 50TB drives in 10 years.
So we can conjecture what anyone could I put in 50TB.

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