Intel's Haswell to extend battery life, set for Taipei launch

May 25, 2013 by Nancy Owano weblog

(Phys.org) —One key selling point in laptops is battery life and Intel earlier this week had good news on that very front. Its upcoming Haswell processors will give users 50 percent more battery life than Ivy Bridge.

That is just one part of what Intel thinks is so great about Haswell.

Haswell chips were designed (1) to reduce , (2) have design advantages to accommodate both tablets and laptops, and (3) deliver longer battery life. In idle or standby mode the chips will extend the computer's battery life by up to 20 times. Voltage regulators were consolidated, to reduce power consumption and that has also translated into smaller motherboards for Haswell chips, in step with smaller devices. The other bit of good news is that there will be no tradeoff in performance,

Intel will formally launch the new chips next month at Computex trade in Taipei.

Haswell chips are said to achieve low power consumption from a power management unit that provides a view of on the chip. It can dynamically adjust consumption in various parts of the chip to reduce the power draw. Faster interconnects on the chip also help reduce power use, according to Intel. Data is transferred more quickly, and so the spend less time working. Haswell represents Intel's fourth-generation Core architecture.

Explore further: Intel revamps chipsets in new mobile push

More information: via Computerworld

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