Live and learn: Most GenXers continue their education

May 7, 2013

More than one in every 10 members of Generation X are enrolled in classes to continue their formal educations, according to a new University of Michigan study released today. In addition, 48 percent of GenXers take continuing education courses, in-service training, and workshops required for professional licenses and certifications.

"This is an impressive level of engagement in lifelong learning," says Jon D. Miller, author of the latest issue of The Generation X Report. "It reflects the changing realities of a global economy, driven by science and technology.

Projected to the 80 million in Generation X, Miller says the findings suggest that 1.8 million young adults are studying to earn , 1.7 million are seeking baccalaureates, and nearly 2 million are taking courses to earn advanced degrees at the masters, doctoral, or professional level.

Miller directs the of American Youth (LSAY) at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR). The study has been funded by the National Science Foundation since 1986, and the current report includes responses from approximately 3,900 who are in their late 30s.

According to Miller, slightly more than 40 percent of GenXers have earned a baccalaureate or higher degree, with those living in cities or suburbs more likely to have a degree than those living in small towns or rural areas.

The study also found that GenXers have earned graduate and professional degrees at a higher rate than any previous generation. By 2011, two decades after finishing high school, 22 percent of those surveyed had completed at least one advanced degree, and 10 percent had completed a doctorate or professional degree.

The report also examined informal sources of learning among Generation X, analyzing how they acquired information about three important contemporary events: influenza, the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident, and .

"We found that adults use a mix of information sources, including traditional print and electronic media, as well as the internet and social media," says Miller.

"But for all three issues we examined, we found that talking with friends and family was cited as a source of information more frequently than traditional news media.

"While a high proportion of young adults are continuing their formal education, reflecting the changing demands of a , many are also using the full resources of their personal networks and the electronic era to keep up with information on emerging issues."

Explore further: The Generation X Report: Survey paints a surprisingly positive portrait

More information: Read or download a full copy of The Generation X Report: home.isr.umich.edu/files/2013/05/GenX_Vol2Iss3_final.pdf

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