Farmers plant rice near crippled Fukushima site

May 22, 2013
Farmers plant rice near Tamura city, 15km west the Fukushima power plant. Farmers have resumed planting rice for market only 15 kilometres (nine miles) from Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, a local official says.

Farmers have resumed planting rice for market only 15 kilometres (nine miles) from Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, a local official said Wednesday.

It was the first time since the March 2011 earthquake-tsunami-nuclear disaster that farmers have gone inside the former 20-kilometre "no-go" zone around the doomed plant to sow rice intended for sale.

The zone has been redefined to let people access areas where the levels of radiation from the plant have been relatively low. Tens of thousands of people remain unable to return to their homes.

On Saturday, three farmers started planting in paddies over an area of six hectares (15 acres) in the city of Tamura, a Fukushima regional agriculture official said.

The No. 3 reactor building at Fukushima power plant, picture in May last year. It is the first time since the March 2011 earthquake-tsunami-nuclear disaster that farmers have gone inside the former 20-kilometre "no-go" zone around the doomed plant to sow rice intended for sale.

"The work has progressed smoothly as the weather recovered," Tsuneaki Oonami told AFP by telephone.

The are located in Miyakoji district where a few dozen farmers used to live before they were evacuated after the devastating quake and tsunami left the plant spewing radiation from its molten reactors.

Since April last year, former residents have been permitted to re-enter the district during the daytime—they are not allowed to stay there overnight.

"We have considerably decontaminated the rice paddies and channelled water for irrigation there," Oonami said, adding that they still have to fight "harmful rumours" about their produce.

The farmers are using fertiliser containing potassium to help curb absorption by rice plants. All rice from the paddies will be checked for before being shipped, said Oonami.

Farmers plant rice near Tamura city, 15km west the Fukushima power plant. The disaster zone has been redefined to let people access areas where the levels of radiation from the plant have been relatively low.

More than 18,000 people were killed when the huge tsunami of March 2011 swept ashore, crushing a stretch of coastline.

The it sparked is not officially recorded as having directly claimed any lives, but it forced mass evacuations, with scientists warning some areas may be uninhabitable for decades.

It also polluted a swathe of prime farmland and provoked a crisis of confidence in Japan's agricultural produce.

Explore further: EU leaders seek last-minute climate deal

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The unexpected benefits of adjustable rate mortgages

1 hour ago

Using loan level data matched to consumer credit records, researchers have been able to determine that a reduction in mortgage payments of as little as $150 a month spurred a reduction in mortgage defaults and an increase ...

Cooling with molecules

1 hour ago

An international team of scientists have become the first ever researchers to successfully reach temperatures below minus 272.15 degrees Celsius – only just above absolute zero – using magnetic molecules. ...

Recommended for you

EU leaders seek last-minute climate deal

1 minute ago

European Union leaders came under pressure Thursday to strike a deal aimed at bolstering Brussels as a trailblazer in fighting global climate change as negotiations went down to the wire.

Research team studies 'regime shifts' in ecosystems

2 hours ago

The prehistory of major ecological shifts spanning multiple millennia can be read in the fine print of microscopic algae, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

mnykolay
1 / 5 (3) May 22, 2013
This is totally unacceptable. Look at the Chernobyl plant explosion and you wont see anybody planting even close to it. Rice will be full of radioactive waste which is if you want to have three balls is not a good idea.
Neinsense99
2.7 / 5 (7) May 29, 2013
... Rice will be full of radioactive waste which is if you want to have three balls is not a good idea.


Your comment does not mean what you think it means. If you want three balls it is a good idea.