EU project plays key role in making nuclear power safer

May 29, 2013
EU project plays key role in making nuclear power safer
Credit: Shutterstock

Impressive steps have been taken to ensure that accident prevention measures in European nuclear power plants (NPP) are as tight as they can be. Nonetheless, accidents can still happen. An EU-funded network has helped to establish Europe as a world leader in the field.

When accidents occur in sensitive environments, such as a nuclear power plant, they can have devastating consequences: core melting, plant damage and subsequent dispersal of into the environment.

The 2011 accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan strongly underlined the need for constant vigilance over nuclear safety. One means by which this has been encouraged in Europe has been through the SARNET ('Severe Accident Research Network of Excellence') network, which has worked to improve knowledge on Severe Accidents (SA), coordinate research resources, and share and disseminate data.

In recent years, European end-users have mostly used integral computer codes developed in the United States for running , resulting in a strong dependence on US technology. By fostering collaborative work on the Accident Source Term Evaluation Code (ASTEC) SARNET has succeeded in consolidating Europe's role as an independent world leader in this field.

This code can be applied to the accident operation of any kind of water-cooled . It simulates an entire SA sequence in a nuclear water-cooled reactor, from the initiating event through to the release of out of the containment.

The SARNET2 project, which was a follow-up to the previous SARNET project, addressed a selection of the highest-priority unresolved issues and uncertainties over how to enhance the safety of existing and future water-cooled NPP. This was largely accomplished through optimising available resources, sharing experiences and encouraging new forms of partnerships. For example, the project managed to reduce the fragmentation between different national R&D programmes, notably in defining common research programmes and developing common computer tools and methodologies for NPP safety assessment.

The project is likely to have a lasting impact not only on the European organisations, but also on the European nuclear industry as a whole. Its key deliverables - ASTEC, safety methodologies and recommendations from state-of-the-art reports can now be used not only for R&D activities, but also for a variety of industrial applications. This is one reason why European industry and safety authorities have played such a vital contributing role in SARNET2.

The hope is that SARNET role as reference for SA research priorities will be consolidated and will help to influence national programmes and funding in the future. All research activities in this field can now be effectively coordinated by the SARNET network, which will contribute to optimising the use of European resources. The network can also provide a wide panel of competencies for supporting other countries to ensure that their capabilities are safe and adequately monitored.

The project also published a text book on severe accident phenomenology, ran a number of education and training programmes and developed working relationships with educational institutions. This helped to raise the profile of this cutting-edge area of research among students and young researchers. Furthermore, a periodic review of priorities and co-programming among participating organisations helped to influence budgetary considerations.

Explore further: Intel wireless charging in a bowl coming sooner than later

More information: SARNET www.sar-net.eu

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Japan vows to tighten nuke safety after accident

May 28, 2013

Japan pledged better safety practices for its troubled nuclear industry Tuesday after an accident at a government research facility that exposed 33 people to minor excess radiation and had not been immediately ...

Radiation leak at Japan lab; small impact expected

May 25, 2013

An atomic research lab in northern Japan has reported a radiation leak that may have affected about 50 people, though none were hospitalized and no impact was expected outside the facility, the lab's operator ...

Countries unite to respond to another Chernobyl disaster

May 08, 2013

Radioactivity as a result of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster in the 1980s is still present in the environment. But 17 national emergency management organisations and 33 research institutes have ...

Japan's TEPCO admits downplaying tsunami risk

Oct 12, 2012

The operator of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant on Friday admitted it had played down the risks of a tsunami to the facility for fear of the financial and regulatory costs.

Recommended for you

Team improves solar-cell efficiency

23 hours ago

New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular ...

Calif. teachers fund to boost clean energy bets

23 hours ago

The California State Teachers' Retirement System says it plans to increase its investments in clean energy and technology to $3.7 billion, from $1.4 billion, over the next five years.

Idealistic Norwegian sun trappers

Sep 19, 2014

The typical Norwegian owner of a solar heating system is a resourceful man in his mid-fifties. He is technically skilled, interested in energy systems, and wants to save money and protect the environment.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

AlasdairLumsden
not rated yet Jun 03, 2013
If the EU wants safe and clean Nuclear, it should fund research and development into the Molten Salt Reactor.

Existing LWR reactors operate at 300 atmospheric pressures and use water as a coolant, meaning they can melt down and release steam and hydrogen/oxygen, which can explode, as happened at Fukushima. MSR reactors on the other hand operate at atmospheric pressure, meaning they can't explode, and as the salt is already molten, can't melt down.

Because the fuel is disolved in a molten salt, it can circulate, achieving 99% burnup, reducing waste to just 1%. MSRs can use Thorium as a fuel, which as abundant as lead and a byproduct of mining - people will pay you to take it away, meaning MSRs have the potential to produce energy cheaper than coal, with zero CO2 emissions.

MSR is an excellent design - search for "Thorium Remix" on Youtube for an excellent overview.