New efforts to curb cellphone theft are nationwide

May 5, 2013

Disturbed by the nationwide epidemic of cellphone robberies and thefts, law enforcement officials are looking to the wireless industry for help.

In San Francisco, where half the robberies were phone-related last year, District Attorney George Gascon is calling on major companies in nearby to create new technology such as a "kill switch" to permanently and quickly disable stolen smartphones to render them worthless.

Stakes are high. Nearly 175 million cellphones were sold in the U.S. in the past year, accounting for $69 billion in sales, according to research firm IDC.

And the says almost one out of three robberies nationwide involves the theft of a mobile phone as a highly-anticipated national database system to track cellphones reported stolen will start this fall.

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1 / 5 (3) May 05, 2013
What a pity you can't make it blow up in the crim's face as well.
not rated yet May 05, 2013
How about sending the user of the stolen phone a bill with the retail price of the phone? If they pay, forward the payment to legal owner. If they don't pay, then they have the normal non-payment consecuances. And they can always contest the bill if they think they can prove that they obtained the phone legally, purchasing it from previous owner.

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