US targets digital currency in huge fraud probe

May 28, 2013
Binary code in a woman's eye reflected from a computer screen in London. The United States on Tuesday unveiled what it said was the world's "largest" money laundering probe against the digital currency operator Liberty Reserve.

The United States on Tuesday unveiled what it said was the world's "largest" money laundering probe against the digital currency operator Liberty Reserve.

The Costa Rica-based entity, which operates a hugely popular online currency system outside of the control of national governments, is charged with running a "$6 billion money laundering scheme and operating an unlicensed money transmitting business," the US Attorney's office for New York said.

said Liberty Reserve processed at least 55 million illegal transactions for at least one million users "and facilitated global criminal conduct."

The probe involved in 17 countries "and is believed to be the largest money laundering in history," the prosecutor's office said.

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kochevnik
1 / 5 (4) May 28, 2013
Zionist banksters paranoid about convertibility from the dollar as they invert markets with their flood of funny money. They know that all their clown currency will ultimately weigh poorly against the ultimate reserve currency, gold. Cutting off any means to purchase real gold is the agenda. China and East are buying any gold they can find
Guy_Underbridge
5 / 5 (1) May 28, 2013
Liberty Reserve processed at least 55 million illegal transactions for at least one million users "and facilitated global criminal conduct."


Sounds like a good time to invest in penitentiary design and construction...
ryggesogn2
2.8 / 5 (4) May 28, 2013
Zionist banksters paranoid about convertibility from the dollar as they invert markets with their flood of funny money. They know that all their clown currency will ultimately weigh poorly against the ultimate reserve currency, gold. Cutting off any means to purchase real gold is the agenda. China and East are buying any gold they can find

Banks, today, can't exist without the state.
Why not blame the state?
kochevnik
1 / 5 (2) May 28, 2013
Zionist banksters paranoid about convertibility from the dollar as they invert markets with their flood of funny money. They know that all their clown currency will ultimately weigh poorly against the ultimate reserve currency, gold. Cutting off any means to purchase real gold is the agenda. China and East are buying any gold they can find

Banks, today, can't exist without the state.
Why not blame the state?
Actually you have that exactly backwards. I do agree with you that a bank can't exist without SOME state. What's happened is that banks like the FED are sanctioned in England as the Bank of England than operate in the USA. In essence you are correct, however by separating domicile from nations in which they participate economically, banks have thwarted state sovereignty worldwide. The USA cannot operate as currently known without FED funny money
VendicarE
5 / 5 (1) May 29, 2013
Freeeeedommmmmmmmmmm

This is just another example of the Evil of Guberment destroying the freedom of individuals to control their money and their lives.

Money Laundering is not a crime according to my Libertarian Friends.
kochevnik
1 / 5 (2) May 29, 2013
Actually money cannot be laundered because it's origins are none of the government's business. It's just another non-crime that's criminalized to serve the banksters

There are crimes that should be prosecuted. The money is criminalized because law enforcement is too lazy to actually do their jobs. They would prefer to dress up in military uniforms and crack skulls

Anyone with enough brains does neot need governments because governments are the cause of most of the problems in the world. This is due to their association with corporations and influence peddlers which usurps the local community needs in favor of globalist crony capitalism