China 'will not accept' carbon tax on EU flights: report

May 19, 2013
A China Southern Airbus 330-200 is seen during the Paris International Air Show at Le Bourget airport near Paris, on June 23, 2011. China will not pay for CO2 emissions by its airlines on flights within Europe, a top civil aviation official reportedly said after the European Commission warned eight Chinese firms face fines for nonpayment.

China will not pay for CO2 emissions by its airlines on flights within Europe, a top civil aviation official reportedly said after the European Commission warned eight Chinese firms face fines for nonpayment.

The world's second largest economy "will not accept any unilateral and compulsory market measures", Yan Mingchi, deputy director-general of the legal and regulation department at the Civil Aviation Administration of , told an aviation forum in Beijing Friday, the China Daily newspaper reported.

He said "airlines in developing countries should be provided with financial and technological support in their efforts at coping with the effects of climate change".

The European Commission said Friday eight Chinese and two Indian airlines face fines totalling 2.4 million euros ($3.1 million) for not paying for their on flights within the bloc.

It said member states could fine the firms, including Chinese flag carrier Air China, under the terms of the EU's System, which is designed to cut the blamed for global warming.

In a highly controversial move last year, the EU added airlines to the ETS regime, sparking howls of protest from the United States and China, which said the move breached international law.

The EC said almost all airlines had fully complied with their ETS obligations, which were consistent with international law and conventions.

However it said eight Chinese carriers, including China Airlines, China Eastern and China Southern, alongside Air India and India's Jet Airways were at fault.

The eight Chinese airlines were liable for fines of some 2.4 million euros combined while the two Indian groups owed much less, at 30,000 euros.

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Sean_W
1.4 / 5 (11) May 19, 2013
When no one has a job it will greatly reduce energy usage and Europeans can heat their homes using wood from the trees in parks and other green spaces, at least for a time. It will mean lots more release of the hated and feared CO2 not to mention diminishing air quality but at least the airlines will be free of all those poor people with their casual clothing lack of breeding. That way our elite can truly spread out and remove economy class seating. Flying will once again be a gentle men's pursuit.
Shakescene21
3.9 / 5 (15) May 19, 2013
If the EU doesn't stand up to China on this issue, then the Europeans may as well scrap their own carbon emmission regulations. China intends to violate European laws even inside European airspace, and will retaliate massively if it doesn't get its way.
I predict that Europe will back down, which will be an environmental tragedy.
EyeNStein
1.7 / 5 (12) May 19, 2013
The whole EU's Emissions Trading System is a farce. It was doomed as soon as trading of CO2 allowances was allowed. If CO2 emitters cash went straight to planting trees it might be transparent and acceptable. But disappearing into the vast EU unaccountable system and some being used to subsidise EU commerce was bound to create conflict.
KBK
1.4 / 5 (12) May 19, 2013
If the EU doesn't stand up to China on this issue, then the Europeans may as well scrap their own carbon emission regulations. China intends to violate European laws even inside European airspace, and will retaliate massively if it doesn't get its way.
I predict that Europe will back down, which will be an environmental tragedy.


You are somehow, naively... assuming that the carbon tax and credit system is somehow inherently honest and real.

It is a fascist scheme, raised under the header of being democratic, liberal, and fair, as a cover story.

It is a total screw over of the public, on and in all fronts, and bears no resemblance to fairness or democracy, or sharing, unless you somehow misconstrue that as: taking and stealing by imperialism and corporatism as quietly ruling/running the undercurrent of politics as a method of feeding itself and controlling many.
Shakescene21
3.8 / 5 (10) May 19, 2013
@KBK I agree that the EU's carbon tax scheme has some serious problems, but it was adopted with good intentions. More importantly, China's objection to this particular tax is not that "It is a fascist scheme". China's objection is that it doesn't need to pay because it is a developing country, so the EU should be helping poor China instead of taxing China as if it was an advanced country.

Basically, China doesn't want to pay this tax, and it has the clout to bully the EU into submission. China has become the world's largest emitter of CO2, and Global Warming will get progressively worse if China doesn't change its behavior.

maxb500_live_nl
3.2 / 5 (13) May 19, 2013
It is clear to everyone following this closely that the EU led carbon project was build with very good intentions. But in a world with governments like China and with many Business with zero morals having good intentions is often not just leading to little progress it is often self inflicting. It`s in my opinion better to stimulate alternatives to get cheaper so they can take down traditional fuels.

The same with foreign Aid. Despite the crises of the 120 Billion Dollars spend last year on global aid 81 Billion came from the EU countries. To quote Bill Gates: "Europe is by far the worlds largest Aid donor". But how much effect has all this European aid for all these decades had. The EU could build a space agency 5 times the size of NASA with this 80 Billion annually. Meaning European Manned MOON bases. European Manned MARS bases and much more European tech power with these kind of budgets. It`s a choice. I think Europe should become much more self serving. The Chinese already are.
OZGuy
5 / 5 (4) May 20, 2013
About time we revisited the term "Developing Country" and refined a new definition.
Howhot
5 / 5 (7) May 20, 2013
If the EU doesn't stand up to China on this issue, then the Europeans may as well scrap their own carbon emmission regulations. China intends to violate European laws even inside European airspace, and will retaliate massively if it doesn't get its way.
I predict that Europe will back down, which will be an environmental tragedy.

I couldn't agree more. This is not an issue about the EU or the carbon tax. This is about Chinese jets dumping toxins on the EU and not playing fair about CO2 reduction.
EyeNStein
2.6 / 5 (9) May 20, 2013
About time we revisited the term "Developing Country" and refined a new definition.

Hans Rosling puts "developed" into perspective
http://www.ted.co...ine.html
If the Chinese are polluting its not because they are rampant consumers the way we are.
seilgu
1 / 5 (7) May 20, 2013
To all who says that China is using the "developing country" excuse, it's not the excuse that matters. Do you judge a person of crime based on only what he says? There are many reasons China doesn't want to pay that ridiculous tax, but one cannot just openly blame EU for it's corruption and governance, therefore an excuse. IMO if EU wants to tax CO2 emissions, China should also do so at EU, and that doesn't really do us any good. Air travel is indispensible in the modern world, it's already very expensive and we don't have cleaner engines for air travel. A better way is to encourage the use of public transportations and electric cars. To tax plane CO2 emission is simply absurd and likely to prompt of conspiracy.
EyeNStein
2.2 / 5 (10) May 20, 2013
Surely the way to do this is to tax aviation fuel at a CO2 neutral level and no more.
And ringfence ALL the revenue to forestry planting. Don't let pen pushers and their fancy 'green' PR projects syphon it off to meetings, expenses and administration heavy taxation schemes.
The Chinese and everyone else will pay when they refuel.
EyeNStein
1.4 / 5 (9) May 20, 2013
We have to adopt localised, self governing, environmentally sustainable finance systems.
As a species we are reaching the point where any additional hierarchy in our administration is not sustainable, and is in fact counter productive. (It takes more resources to add management than the added management gives in benefits.)
But of course one locality will try to undercut their neighbours as tax havens, so we are stuffed.
deepsand
2.9 / 5 (16) May 20, 2013
About time we revisited the term "Developing Country" and refined a new definition.

Hans Rosling puts "developed" into perspective
http://www.ted.co...ine.html
If the Chinese are polluting its not because they are rampant consumers the way we are.

Quite correct. China pollutes because the US and Europe expatriated their smokestack industries to China so as to gain cheaper labor.
Howhot
5 / 5 (6) May 20, 2013
Thats a good point deep, however you have to understand the purpose of the tax. It's not to punish the polluters, its meant to encourage polluting user to reduce their quantity of pollutants created delivering their product. If the Chinese developed super efficient jets that would pay a return by lowering the CO2 tax burden. Or if they developed and used bio derived jet fuels that would also. On the European side, they can use the funds generated to implement newer greener energy resources that also reduce long term CO2 emissions.

This kind of common good feed-back only works if all participants play by the rules. In the long run it benefits China as well in several ways besides just CO2 reduction in the EU. You would have cleaner planes landing and taking off from China as well resulting in a reduction of their pollution issues.
deepsand
2.7 / 5 (14) May 20, 2013
... you have to understand the purpose of the tax. It's not to punish the polluters, its meant to encourage polluting user to reduce their quantity of pollutants created delivering their product.

The bulk of CO2 emissions resulting from transportation of Chinese made goods is not from aircraft, but from ocean shipping.

If the Chinese developed super efficient jets that would pay a return by lowering the CO2 tax burden

China is not expected to have its first domestically produced airliners rolling out until 2020. Until then, they are, like most of the world, heavily dependent on Boeing and Airbus.
Howhot
5 / 5 (6) May 20, 2013
The bulk of CO2 emissions resulting from transportation of Chinese made goods is not from aircraft, but from ocean shipping.

Thats a point well taken. Shipping containers is the life-blood of the modern free trade economy. It's always been my opinion (this is just an opinion) that we should restrict fossil fuel use to hard to change systems that can only be operated that way. That is until a fuel alternative was found. When you think about how difficult it really is changing fuel sources, there a bound to be many set backs. It's not easy, people have to change, businesses have to change, and adaptation is what will dictate the survivors.

That is assuming a lot of behind the scenes agreements are made and people decide to work together for the common good. In this case China and India could say to the EU, Screw you and force EU into confrontation. But that is not the goal for China nor the EU so some type of compromise will happen. IMHO.


deepsand
2.5 / 5 (13) May 21, 2013
Add to the mix the desire of the US and Canada to increase their exports of Coal and tar sand oil to China, the West's addiction to goods inexpensively manufactured in China, and China's dependency on exports to keep its labor force from revolting and you've got all the necessary ingredients for a grand compromise.
triplehelix
1.8 / 5 (10) May 22, 2013
Good on China. Stealth BS tax dodging is what USA did during the 70's and 80's rampantly and nobody cared. China does it and suddenly it's a crap developing country with loads of corruption. Sorry but I see no difference between 70's-80's USA and todays China. Everyones just jealous that China is now the worlds 2nd largest economy and soon to be the 1st largest. You want to know why they're such a big economy? Because they actually make things, they don't carbon tax everything, they use resources and materials and export a ton of product. Their governments don't spend TRILLIONS on rubbish windfarms and rubbish like that. That's why they have a load of money and we don't. We're spending on rubbish like no tomorrow and raising taxes while China is spending on decent areas which yields new cash, and lowering taxes.