Boss crocs: Rethinking crocodile management

May 02, 2013

(Phys.org) —University of Queensland ecologists have released research that will result in better crocodiles management and intervention. Dr Hamish Campbell, from UQ's School of Biological Sciences, and colleagues from Australia Zoo have used satellite tagging to accurately record the location of male and female adult crocodiles during the breeding and nesting season.

"Social interactions are important to how estuarine move and utilise new habitat," Dr Campbell said.

"It is necessary to consider crocodile interactions prior to the implementation of management interventions.

"Removing the large dominant male crocodile 'The boss croc' will create a vacuum in the area that could be filled by another male which may be less wary of humans."

The study, published in the PloS-ONE, involved tagging adult in the Wenlock River.

was collected twice daily and the calculation of the cumulative home range illustrated the of the crocodiles.

Dr Campbell said the researchers found subordinate crocodiles travelled over 1000 km in 6 months, and could travel as much as 50 km in a single day

The 'boss crocs' were also very active but they moved around within their territory. .

"The data showed that large adult estuarine crocodiles were far more mobile than previously considered, and populations live within a complex social system," he said.

"It appears that the boss crocs control that contain females, and force out subordinate males that can still be more than four metres in length.

"These males roam over hundreds of kilometres in search of a mate, and are likely to be the crocodiles that turn up as problem animals."

Dr Campbell said the study strongly recommend that the impact of crocodile removal on the of the population be thoroughly evaluated.

"Only by thorough evaluation of this management strategy, taking into account any consequences of social disturbance, can the desired outcome be achieved," he said.

Explore further: Study pumps up the volume on understanding of marine invertebrate hearing

More information: www.plosone.org/article/info%3… journal.pone.0062127

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