Blueprints for 3D handgun take refuge in Pirate Bay (Update)

May 10, 2013 by Robert Macpherson
A 3D printer prints an object during an exhibition in New York on April 22, 2013. Blueprints for the world's first 3D printable handgun took refuge Friday at file-sharing website The Pirate Bay, upsetting a US government attempt to get them off the Internet.

Virtual blueprints for the world's first 3D printable handgun found a safe harbor Friday at file-sharing website The Pirate Bay, dodging a US government attempt to pull them off the Internet.

Defense Distributed, a Texas nonprofit that promotes the open-source development of firearms using 3D printers, withdrew the files needed to make the single-shot Liberator at the behest of the State Department on Thursday.

"This file has been removed from public access at the request of the US Department of Defense Trade Controls," said Defense Distributed on its website, which it embellished with the State Department seal.

"Until further notice, the United States government claims control of the information," it added without elaboration.

The State Department—which confirmed it has been in contact with Defense Distributed, but gave no specifics—is tasked with monitoring and licensing US arms exports through its Directorate of Defense Trade Controls.

"The United States is cognizant of the potentially adverse consequences of indiscriminate arms transfers, and therefore we strictly regulate exported defense items and technologies to protect our national interests," State Department spokesman Patrick Ventrell said.

But the crackdown on the Liberator clearly came too late to forestall the re-posting of its computer-aided design (CAD) files on The Pirate Bay, a popular peer-to-peer file sharing service that has been linked by its critics to film and music piracy.

"Nice try blocking this fed," wrote one Pirate Bay user, utilizing a slang word for federal government, in a comments section that veered strongly in favor of Americans' constitutional right to own and carry firearms.

An Ultimaker 3D printer prints an object on May 9, 2013 in New York City. Blueprints for the world's first 3D printable handgun took refuge Friday at file-sharing website The Pirate Bay, upsetting a US government attempt to get them off the Internet.

Guns of all kinds have been a divisive issue in the United States since the December 2012 massacre of 20 children at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, that prompted fresh calls for tougher gun laws.

The white-and-blue .380-caliber Liberator bears a vague resemblance to its chunky namesake, the FP-45 Liberator pistol that the United States developed during World War II to be air-dropped to French Resistance fighters.

A sample object, printed with a 3D printer, is on display during an exhibition in New York on April 22, 2013.

For the Liberator to conform with US firearms law, the CAD files call for an inch-big chunk of steel to be sealed with epoxy glue in front of the trigger guard, so that the weapon can be spotted by metal detectors.

The only other non-plastic part is a tiny nail that acts as the firing pin.

It was successfully test-fired last week with a .380-caliber bullet by its inventor, University of Texas law student Cody Wilson, although it exploded into pieces when a larger rifle bullet was used.

Wilson said Friday he sees a court battle looming on the horizon, in a case that raises questions about online freedoms and the possibilities of open-source 3D printing innovation in a borderless Internet world.

"I'm going to need some high powered legal help, but thankfully a lot of people have pledged support, including the Electronic Frontier Foundation," he told Motherboard, a technology blog (www.motherboard.vice.com).

"This is not the last time (legal action) is going to happen, so perhaps now it's time to have the fight," he added.

Supporters of tougher gun laws in the United States—where there are nearly as many guns (an estimated 300 million) as there are people (about 315 million) and more than 30,000 gun-related deaths a year—have voiced alarm.

"Stomach-churning," noted Senator Charles Schumer of New York, while Congressman Steve Israel said it shows the urgency of adopting his initiative to outlaw plastic homemade guns that might escape metal or X-ray detection.

No longer prohibitively expensive, 3D printers can be bought for about the same price as a top-end laptop computer. Brooklyn-based MakerBot, for instance, markets its desktop Replicator 2 for $2,199 with delivery in a week.

After the Newtown massacre, MakerBot took down CAD files for semi-automatic rifle parts that gun enthusiasts had posted in its Thingiverse CAD library, which otherwise features pen holders, lamp shades, a tabletop wind turbine and a printable microscope among its most popular open-source designs.

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TheGhostofOtto1923
2.1 / 5 (19) May 10, 2013
How can I tell that this article was written in britain? Well, it contains little factual data on this particular subject.

"...one of the most skeptical voices of all is an ardent anti-gun violence advocate.

"In terms of the implications for guns laws, we think it's incredibly overblown," said Ladd Everitt, director of communications for the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence. "Could someone considering a terrorist (or criminal) act buy a 3D printer, download the files, experiment [with them] and go through the full process to make one gun, not knowing how many times it will fire? Probably not."

"...using 3D printers to make guns "is the most ridiculous way of making a gun part [because] it's so brittle, so expensive, and so impractical."
http://news.cnet....erblown/

-They make these in prison
http://cityroom.b...zip-gun/
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.1 / 5 (16) May 10, 2013
Here is something much more dependable and deadly than a plastic printed gun which blows your jaw off after 2 rounds
http://www.youtub...V3lmbSv4
bottomlesssoul
3.6 / 5 (7) May 10, 2013
They can't possibly understand how the internet and torrent sharing works. All anyone needs to do is add the torrent to another torrent host, there are tens of thousands to choose from.

The best part is it is also very fluid, torrent sites are coming and going all the time. Any kid can start one up in a few minutes.

Didn't anyone learn from Paris Hilton?
packrat
2.6 / 5 (13) May 10, 2013
Here is something much more dependable and deadly than a plastic printed gun which blows your jaw off after 2 rounds
http://www.youtub...V3lmbSv4


Not a bad design actually. With just a little more work he could add a real trigger setup to it.
scidog
5 / 5 (5) May 11, 2013
looks like a 21st century Zip gun.
EyeNStein
1.4 / 5 (19) May 11, 2013
I'm with the US government on this one.
What possible good use is there for a gun that explodes in the users hand, could be made by kids and could evade airport security.
But as usual there are folk who get their kicks pretending to be anarchists and using the freedoms of the web to make them feel more powerful than the US Government.
By doing so they erode those freedoms for everyone.
Don't they realise that if they had taunted a less moral super-state they would have all ended up in a pine box after a plateful of polonium-210 many years ago: And the Pirate bay servers would be no more.
ValeriaT
1.4 / 5 (13) May 11, 2013
They can't possibly understand how the Internet and torrent sharing works.
The Internet is controlled and maintained with government. For example at the case of global war crisis you shouldn't be surprised, if the USA Internet would remain separated from the rest of world immediately. From this perspective I do consider such a demonstrations of Internet freedom and liberty somewhat naive.
Jo01
2.5 / 5 (12) May 11, 2013
You cannot stop people doing this.
I made guns when I was 12, I even made the bullets, gunpowder and electrical ignition myself and that was before the Internet.
Governments should stop mistrusting people they govern and start to stimulate and enhance judgement of individuals instead of erasing it by outlawing everything. (Of course if someone acts irresponsible or violent that person has to be corrected according to law.)
Mistrust is the end of society.

J.
Jo01
2 / 5 (8) May 11, 2013
They can't possibly understand how the Internet and torrent sharing works.
The Internet is controlled and maintained with government. For example at the case of global war crisis you shouldn't be surprised, if the USA Internet would remain separated from the rest of world immediately. From this perspective I do consider such a demonstrations of Internet freedom and liberty somewhat naive.


The Internet is designed to be resilient, it will be (almost) impossible to separate such a network from the rest of the world because Internet links can be made over almost any medium, like for example radio (shortwave) and laser transmissions.

J.
Doug_Huffman
2.7 / 5 (14) May 11, 2013
Guns of all kinds have been a divisive issue in the United States since the December 2012 massacre of 20 children at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, that prompted fresh calls for tougher gun laws.
That's a rather short-sighted point of view for the issue of American's RKABA.

While credited to AFP, the only on-line copy of this article was from Pakistan, that tower of personal liberties and rights.
geokstr
2.9 / 5 (16) May 11, 2013
Meanwhile, no doubt, the plans for building bombs designed to inflict the maximum in human casualties out of pressure cookers and other common household items are still available.
gwrede
1.9 / 5 (9) May 11, 2013
Here is something much more dependable and deadly than a plastic printed gun which blows your jaw off after 2 rounds
http://www.youtub...V3lmbSv4
Not a bad design actually. With just a little more work he could add a real trigger setup to it.
The whole idea with this one is, it has no moving parts! Therefore it is very dependable. (Of course, this one does show up at the airport scanner. :-) )

But this is only for those who may actually need use it. For liquor store heists it's not good because it doesn't look like a gun, and it definite doesn't look scary. So it might be best for post-revolution home defense if you have shells but no shotgun.
ValeriaT
1.5 / 5 (8) May 11, 2013
The Internet is designed to be resilient, it will be (almost) impossible to separate such a network from the rest of the world because Internet links can be made over almost any medium, like for example radio (shortwave) and laser transmissions
. It could be done, but the functionality and capacity would be seriously impacted. You couldn't use the HTTP protocol, for example, i.e. the web (web<> internet). The internet was designed to be robust for provider of internet (DARPA in the time of creation), not for internet users itself. After all, as recent examples demonstrated, the governement of China, North Korea, Egypt, Syria or Iran can disable the Internet functionality for 99% of internet users easily. Don't believe, that the USA government has a worse cababilities in this regard. Not accidentally most of root nameservers are placed at the USA.
cantdrive85
3.1 / 5 (21) May 11, 2013
Amerika, the land of the not so free and not at all brave. In fact, in has become a fascist corptocracy, populated by a bunch of pansy progressives who don't understand what it means to be an adult with the responsibility it requires.
antialias_physorg
3.5 / 5 (2) May 11, 2013
It's sort of bizarre that national governmental institutions think that by 'banning stuff' (after more than 100k downloads) it'll somehow diasppear from the INTER(national)net...or people's computers/USB sticks, ...

Where do they live? The 19th century?

Until further notice, the United States government claims control of the information

Good luck with that [/sarcasm]
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.5 / 5 (10) May 11, 2013
Not a bad design actually. With just a little more work he could add a real trigger setup to it
-Like this you mean?
http://www.youtub...eD5FXIFI

When I was young and stupid I made a dukes of hazard-type device on the end of an arrow with a 12ga shell and a nail firing pin which shot forward on impact. Luckily I was behind a pile of dirt as the rig came sailing right back at me faster than I shot it. Proof of concept though.

If the feds are reading this it is a big fat lie.

Here is something that I know is illegal in britain.
http://www.youtub...riSTV5XQ

-Because, isnt everything?
ValeriaT
1.3 / 5 (12) May 11, 2013
think that by 'banning stuff it'll somehow disappear from the INTER(national)net...or people's computers/USB sticks
Because it works for 99% of people. It's like the banning of children pornography. If it's done consequentially, it just does work. For example, most of people (including you) believe, that the cold fusion is BS. Why? Because someone wanted you believe so.
antialias_physorg
4.2 / 5 (5) May 11, 2013
For example, most of people (including you) believe, that the cold fusion is BS. Why? Because someone wanted you believe so.

You know: Rossi (et al.)'s own press releases are doing a pretty good job of showing how much bunk it is. No need fo some conspiracy theory.
ab3a
3.4 / 5 (5) May 11, 2013
In a broader sense, as automated fabrication of devices becomes more commonplace and within reach of the average person, any hope of restricting the fabrication of anything will become mostly pointless.

Regulating commerce is one thing. Regulating construction for personal use is another.

I await the open source bicycle, the open source radio (that's not even new), the open source tractor, the open source chip fabrication lab, and so on.

What we are doing is returning manufacturing back to the scale of the village blacksmith --only this time, the machine doing the fabrication has the entire library of humanity available on the Internet.
kochevnik
2 / 5 (8) May 11, 2013
"Until further notice, the United States government claims control of the information,"

Good fucking luck with that...
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.1 / 5 (11) May 11, 2013
For example, most of people (including you) believe, that the cold fusion is BS. Why? Because someone wanted you believe so.

You know: Rossi (et al.)'s own press releases are doing a pretty good job of showing how much bunk it is. No need fo some conspiracy theory.
I do not like it when people decide that something is some way or other before actually finding out which way it actually is.

The proper stance is 'well lets wait until we find out which way it actually is before we decide one way or the other.'

This is the way of science nicht wahr?
packrat
2.9 / 5 (14) May 11, 2013
]The whole idea with this one is, it has no moving parts! Therefore it is very dependable. (Of course, this one does show up at the airport scanner. :-) )


It does have moving parts... 2 springs, finishing nail for a firing pin. hammer/sear , and trigger at minimum. All but the nail is plastic but it will still show up on any xray machine. It's also made to chamber a 380 cartridge would would be pretty worthless for self protection or much of anything else since it's one of the lowest powered cartridges out there. This was designed mostly as a simple "can it be done" exercise more than anything else.

Something that everyone seems to forget is the fed has no jurisdiction on it as long as one doesn't try to sell or give them away. Legally you can't sell it locally, over state lines or even give it away to a friend. You can make them all day long as long as you keep them as a personal weapon only. There are many much better designs already available on the net
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.8 / 5 (10) May 11, 2013
]The whole idea with this one is, it has no moving parts! Therefore it is very dependable. (Of course, this one does show up at the airport scanner. :-) )


It does have moving parts... 2 springs, finishing nail for a firing pin. hammer/sear , and trigger at minimum. All but the nail is plastic but it will still show up on any xray machine. It's also made to chamber a 380 cartridge would would be pretty worthless for self protection or much of anything else since it's one of the lowest powered cartridges out there. This was designed mostly as a simple "can it be done" exercise more than anything else.
Read the thread. You misread the post.
There are many much better designs already available on the net
All of which will blow up in your face. Plastic firing chambers dont last long. Pipes do.
ValeriaT
1.4 / 5 (10) May 11, 2013
The proper stance is 'well lets wait until we find out which way it actually is before we decide one way or the other.' This is the way of science nicht wahr?
If nothing else, to judge the validity of cold fusion by the moment, when some entrepreneur manages some business with it is pretty imbecile. It's like the waiting for acceptation of relativity, until someone sells the first relativity based GPS system. The science simply doesn't work so. BTW The application of double standards in acceptation of new findings belongs into signs of pathological skepticism.
packrat
2.7 / 5 (12) May 11, 2013

It does have moving parts... 2 springs, finishing nail for a firing pin. hammer/sear , and trigger at minimum. All but the nail is plastic but it will still show up on any xray machine. It's also made to chamber a 380 cartridge would would be pretty worthless for self protection or much of anything else since it's one of the lowest powered cartridges out there. This was designed mostly as a simple "can it be done" exercise more than anything else.
Read the thread. You misread the post.
There are many much better designs already available on the net
All of which will blow up in your face. Plastic firing chambers dont last long. Pipes do.


Wrong.... I've had better plans available on my personal website for almost 10 years and there isn't a single one of them that would blow up in your face either.
Huns
3 / 5 (10) May 11, 2013
Governments should stop mistrusting people they govern and start to stimulate and enhance judgement of individuals instead of erasing it by outlawing everything.

The point of government is to concentrate power at the top. People who crave power and influence (often due to personality disorders, a poor sense of boundaries, an upbringing that failed to teach them how to use aggression fairly rather than indiscriminately, etc.) gravitate towards important government jobs, and then those jobs become their outlet to advance their own interests and those of others who they care to help out (family, old college buddies, etc.) Part of this lust for power is a strong urge to defend it. Therefore, we see all sorts of red herrings (like the furor over 3D printed gun parts, when you can make a zip gun for under ten dollars, to name one) that let them keep taking liberties with the constitution and our trust. At work, they slap fight all day about political parties. It's all a scam.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.7 / 5 (10) May 11, 2013
Wrong.... I've had better plans available on my personal website for almost 10 years and there isn't a single one of them that would blow up in your face either.
They've been 3D printing firing chambers for 10 years? And we're just now hearing about them?

And the very latest designs do this?

"He and John retreated to a safe distance, and John pulled his yellow string again. This time the gun exploded, sending shards of white ABS plastic flying into the weeds and bringing the Liberator's first field trial to an abrupt end."

"Wilson showed me a video of an ABS plastic barrel the group printed attached to a non-printed gun body firing ten rounds of .380 ammunition before breaking on the eleventh"

-Post your designs with plastic firing chambers so that we may compare them to ones that blow up. Or, post a vid of you firing say 50 rounds through one of your guns with a plastic firing chamber. In your hand.

Come on be a mensch.
Skepticus
1.3 / 5 (8) May 12, 2013
Thank God the US gov nibbled it in the bud! I am lobbying to make 3D printers and their operators/owners subjected to FBI, CIA, NSA, Home Land Security and the Congress for on-site inspections and monitoring 24/7. We paid lots for our lobbyists to those to keep our arms manufacturing and exporting businesses to ear us and them healthy profits, therefore those upstart smart-arses must be stopped from enabling everyone to make their weapons! This is the start of Replicator Technology. Let unchecked, they would progress to printers of metallic alloys and ceramics, then our control will go down the toilet! We make the laws, and they are criminals!
packrat
2.7 / 5 (14) May 12, 2013
Wrong.... I've had better plans available on my personal website for almost 10 years and there isn't a single one of them that would blow up in your face either.
They've been 3D printing firing chambers for 10 years? And we're just now hearing about them?

And the very latest designs do this?

"He and John retreated to a safe distance, and John pulled his yellow string again. This time the gun exploded, sending shards of white ABS plastic flying into the weeds and bringing the Liberator's first field trial to an abrupt end."

"Wilson showed me a video of an ABS plastic barrel the group printed attached to a non-printed gun body firing ten rounds of .380 ammunition before breaking on the eleventh"

-Post your designs with plastic firing chambers so that we may compare them to ones that blow up. Or, post a vid of you firing say 50 rounds through one of your guns with a plastic firing chamber. In your hand.

Come on be a mensch.


I didn't say they were plastic did I?
Jo01
1.6 / 5 (10) May 12, 2013
It could be done, but the functionality and capacity would be seriously impacted. You couldn't use the HTTP protocol, for example, i.e. the web (web<> internet). The internet was designed to be robust for provider of internet (DARPA in the time of creation), not for internet users itself. After all, as recent examples demonstrated, the governement of China, North Korea, Egypt, Syria or Iran can disable the Internet functionality for 99% of internet users easily. Don't believe, that the USA government has a worse cababilities in this regard. Not accidentally most of root nameservers are placed at the USA


Robustness means the Internet can't be shut down from one point and Linux makes it possible to set up your own network services. Maybe only one percent of the population can do that but that's a huge number.
Name services can be replaced, this means that not all of the web is reachable but it can be used by proxy and even the web will be up in a short time.

J.
EyeNStein
1.7 / 5 (12) May 12, 2013
The conflict in these posts isn't about a plastic gun: or the NRA against Obama. Or defence of the second amendment. Its conflict between a nanny state which seeks to make our lives bland and controllable; and the 'freedom to do anything we want and bear the consequences' opposition.
But this is the wrong battleground. Do we really want to make it as easy as a double click on a USB stick, for our kids to make gun parts on their school 3D printer?
I made fireworks as a kid, but at least I had to test mixtures and learn make them from raw ingredients and thereby learn the power and risks of the mixture. Not simply create lethal force with a double click.
We allow a responsible kid to build a fusor nuclear fusion experiment in their garage. But that is not the same as allowing an irresponsible kid to easily take/make a gun in school.
Jo01
2 / 5 (8) May 12, 2013
... Do we really want to make it as easy as a double click on a USB stick, for our kids to make gun parts on their school 3D printer?
... Not simply create lethal force with a double click.
We allow a responsible kid to build a fusor nuclear fusion experiment in their garage. But that is not the same as allowing an irresponsible kid to easily take/make a gun in school.


It takes only one second for a child to drive away in the Hummer of his parents... or a few minutes to print blasphemy of a super intolerant religion and spread it at school or email it to all entry's in your address book, etc.
Point is ofcourse that children should always be supervised otherwise harm will follow.

J.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.4 / 5 (9) May 12, 2013
I didn't say they were plastic did I?
So you've been 3D printing guns with metal for 10 years then? Or some other material - India ink maybe?

Is this your work perhaps?
http://www.youtub...a_player

-No? Aw you're just playin fuknuts aren't ya? Sure you are.
Thank God the US gov nibbled it in the bud! I am lobbying to make 3D printers and their operators/owners subjected to FBI, CIA, NSA, Home Land Security and the Congress for on-site inspections and monitoring 24/7
I am going to hack into your 3D printer to print out a bomb and blow your house up. And if the feds are reading this it is a big fat lie.
packrat
2.9 / 5 (15) May 12, 2013
I didn't say they were plastic did I?
So you've been 3D printing guns with metal for 10 years then? Or some other material - India ink maybe?


No I didn't say they were for use on a 3d printer either....They are just normal plans for actual useful firearms that are made from metal like normal. All but one are black powder designs and the one that isn't is a .22 caliber design. They would require actual metal working skills like any other device made from steel. Are you really an idiot or do you just pretend to be one on here because after that last comment you made you are not a person that I would allow to see or download any of them and if I was still doing gunsmithing work you would be told to leave the premises immediately as soon as you walked into any gun shop I worked at. I would also notify the authorities and every other gun shop in the area about you. You are obviously a mentally ill person and shouldn't qualify to own a firearm.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.4 / 5 (11) May 12, 2013
Still playing fuknuts I see. The thread and all the comments are about printing guns out of plastic. Did you miss this?

You can talk about anything you want I suppose and pretend its about something else. You can love reading what you write and not care what anyone has to say.
They are just normal plans for actual useful firearms that are made from metal like normal. All but one are black powder designs and the one that isn't is a .22 caliber design
Who cares?
I would also notify the authorities and every other gun shop in the area about you
Even a dimwit knows that printing a bomb is not possible. Fuknuts.
packrat
2.5 / 5 (11) May 12, 2013
You obviously didn't follow the conversation going on in the responses but that is beside the point at the moment. If you had any engineering knowledge you would be capable of understanding that your last comment is completely incorrect. Both the casing and the explosives needed could be done with a 3d printer. I'm not going to explain how to you though because you are a sick person and don't need that information. Don't bother to respond and call me any more silly names as I won't be reading them or responding to you again.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.4 / 5 (9) May 12, 2013
No wait - you've got to explain how a 3D printer can make explosive material out of ABS plastic. Oh yeah - plastic explosive. I forgot. You should put this on the pirate bay before you are silenced.

Fuknuts.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) May 13, 2013
I made fireworks as a kid, but at least I had to test mixtures and learn make them from raw ingredients and thereby learn the power and risks of the mixture. Not simply create lethal force with a double click.

To be fair: The kid would still have to get a hold of a bullet (of the correct caliber). Printing bullets isn't (yet) feasible. Printing gunpowder much less so.
Skepticus
1 / 5 (5) May 13, 2013
I am going to hack into your 3D printer to print out a bomb and blow your house up. And if the feds are reading this it is a big fat lie.

He he Herr Otto, you are taking things so seriouly or passonately that you missed all the satire and sacasm. I don't have a 3D printer, a replicator so you can hack into...anyway, I don't know what the fuss about 3d printers is all about. CNC machines have been around for ages, they are not that expensive and used everywhere, the feds does not have them on radar, and if i program it properly, it can make all sorts of guns that last more than a few shots and doesn't blow up in my face!
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.5 / 5 (8) May 13, 2013
I am going to hack into your 3D printer to print out a bomb and blow your house up. And if the feds are reading this it is a big fat lie.

He he Herr Otto, you are taking things so seriouly or passonately that you missed all the satire and sacasm. I don't have a 3D printer, a replicator so you can hack into...anyway, I don't know what the fuss about 3d printers is all about. CNC machines have been around for ages, they are not that expensive and used everywhere, the feds does not have them on radar, and if i program it properly, it can make all sorts of guns that last more than a few shots and doesn't blow up in my face!
Even a dimwit knows that printing a bomb is not possible. Fuknuts.
Printing bullets isn't (yet) feasible
Plastic bullets are indeed a reality.
http://en.wikiped...c_bullet

Soft Al or Cu metal cartridges should be fairly easy with your sintering process. If you are sheik fuknuts with too much money and very few brains that is.
NikFromNYC
1.8 / 5 (10) May 15, 2013
The revolution here is single-use disposable directional fragmentation mines that fire a hundred or a thousand or ten thousand 22 caliber bullets in a wide array, making machine guns rather boring in comparison. Once a crazy kid uploads a tested design, anybody can make hundreds of them in a month.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) May 15, 2013
I am going to hack into your 3D printer to print out a bomb and blow your house up.

I think you're missing something fundamental about the nature of 3D printers. With it you can print STRUCTURES based on available printing materials. If volatile compounds aren't part of your printer's arsenal of printable materials (and why should they be) then all you get by hacking into someone's printer is the casing for a bomb.
Not so scary.

The worst you could do by hacking into someone's printer is akin to the black fax hack: Print a solid block of stuff or until the printer runs out of material.
http://en.wikiped...lack_fax
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.4 / 5 (9) May 15, 2013
I think you're missing something fundamental about the nature of 3D printers. With it you can print STRUCTURES based on available printing materials
Okay I want to see a show of hands. How many here realize that I was making a joke about printing a bomb? And how many here are obtuse germans with no sense of humor? Right.

So when do you think they will be able to do chemistry with printers AA? Soon? They could print and initiate reactions with coherent radiation, vibration, electricity, plasma, and such dont you think?
Estevan57
2.9 / 5 (17) May 15, 2013
Count me as one vote for you're crazy as a shithouse rat - hacking and bombs? - nice joke!

antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (2) May 16, 2013
Okay I want to see a show of hands. How many here realize that I was making a joke about printing a bomb?

You're not fooling anone. Just admit that your comment was dumb.

So when do you think they will be able to do chemistry with printers AA?

Only if we ever get atomic scale printing to work. And that is still some ways into teh future (since it also requires storage by element - which isn't trivial for a lot of elements)
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.4 / 5 (9) May 16, 2013
-Nope. I believe the correct answer was 'Yesterday'.

"Just as early 3D printers were used for rapid prototyping, his new chemical printer can initially be used to rapidly discover new compounds.  And if you look at the development of 3D printers, it is not hard to see that in the near future you could print highly specialized chemicals and even pharmaceuticals. The team is currently working on printing ibuprofen, the main ingredient in popular painkillers. This, of course, raises a regulatory red flag, and it will be difficult to regulate what individuals in all parts of the world will do with access to the Internet and a 3D chemical printer."

-GOOGLE can be friend or foe.

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