Alaska volcano's ash prompts flight cancellations

May 20, 2013 by Rachel D'oro

An Alaska volcano eruption is prompting regional airlines to cancel flights to nearby communities, including a town that reported traces of fallen ash.

The says Pavlof Volcano has released ash plumes as high as 22,000 feet (6,705 meters). Clouds obscured the volcano Monday, but scientists say at the volcano 625 miles (1,005 kilometers) southwest of Anchorage show continuing tremors.

Geologist Chris Waythomas says the abrasive ash has not risen enough to threaten international air traffic passing over the volcano-rich Aleutian arc. have reached high enough, however, to affect flights of some smaller planes.

Anchorage-based regional carrier Penair has canceled a dozen passenger and cargo flights to several communities. They include Sand Point, which reported a dusting of ash Sunday.

Ace Air Cargo canceled two flights.

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