Alaska volcano shoots ash 15,000 feet into the air

May 18, 2013 by Rachel D'oro
In this photo provided by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory, the Pavlof volcano erupts Thursday, May 16, 2013, as seen from the air from the southwest in Cold Bay, Alaska. (AP Photo/Alaskan Volcano Observatory, Theo Chesley)

(AP)—One of Alaska's most restless volcanoes has shot an ash cloud 15,000 feet into the air in an ongoing eruption that has drawn attention from a nearby community but isn't expected to threaten air traffic.

An in the region says small planes have flown around the plume from Pavlof . Ash would have to rise tens of thousands of feet to threaten larger planes.

In this photo provided by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory, the Pavlof volcano erupts Thursday, May 16, 2013, as seen from the air from the southwest in Cold Bay, Alaska. Lava fountaining is visible near the summit, and steam and ash clouds rise from the northwest flank where a lava flow advances down the slope. (AP Photo/Alaskan Volcano Observatory, Rachel Kremer)

The eruption began Monday, and a photograph shows lava spraying out.

Air traffic controller John Maxwell says residents in the small community of Cold Bay, about 40 miles from Pavlof, are concerned that ash could damage their power generators. But he says wind has blown the ash away from the area.

Pavlof is 625 miles southwest of Anchorage in the Aleutian arc.

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