Urban grass might be greener, but that doesn't mean it's 'greener'

Apr 09, 2013 by Tom Robinette
Urban grass might be greener, but that doesn't mean it's 'greener'
University of Cincinnati professor Amy Townsend-Small and her team use flux chambers, shown here, in their research on urban lawn management. Credit: Amy Townsend-Small/University of Cincinnati

New research from the University of Cincinnati shows how some things you do to make your lawn green might not be conducive to "going green."

Amy Townsend-Small, a UC assistant professor of geology and geography, will present her research, " Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in ," at the Association of American Geographers annual meeting to be held April 9-13 in Los Angeles. The interdisciplinary forum is attended by more than 7,000 scientists from around the world and features an array of geography-related presentations, workshops and field trips.

At the meeting, Townsend-Small will discuss the effects lawn management techniques have on greenhouse gas production in . She says there's a high energy cost associated with common lawn-care methods such as mowing, irrigation and fertilization due to the processing and transport required for these products and services.

"Landscaping is something everyone can understand," Townsend-Small says. "You probably have your own maintenance routine you do. To make your lawn look nice, you need to use fossil fuels, which emit carbon dioxide. Depending on the management intensity, lawns could either be a small sink – meaning they store carbon – or a small source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere."

Fossil fuels are used to power lawn mowers and trimmers, to pump , and to make fertilizers – and all of these activities emit carbon dioxide.

For her research, Townsend-Small monitored the and storage – known as carbon sequestration – in the soil of urban lawns in Los Angeles and Cincinnati. Despite the variation between the two regions, she found the lawns had surprisingly similar abilities to absorb carbon and store it in soils. But there's a stark contrast in how those lawns are managed, leading to differences in their .

Townsend-Small found that while having a well-cared-for lawn will improve its carbon-quelling capacity, intensive lawn care isn't worth the atmospheric side effects. For example, in California's arid environment, the management required and fossil fuel energy expended to keep lawns looking lush consumes so much energy that it counteracts the soil's natural carbon sequestration abilities. But if you head nearly 2,500 miles east to Cincinnati, rainfall is more plentiful. This means more lawns don't require irrigation, helping reduce the carbon cost of lawn maintenance and preserve the benefits.

This study is the first of its kind to compare the environmental cost of making urban lawns rich and productive with leaving them unmanaged and undisturbed. Two undergraduate students in UC's Women In Science and Engineering program gathered hundreds of local soil samples at different sites and analyzed the emission of powerful such as nitrous oxide and methane. The University of Cincinnati proved to be an ideal location for Townsend-Small's project thanks to the proximity of the managed green spaces on campus and the natural environment of nearby city parks.

"That's one thing that's special about UC. It's in the middle of the city, and it's a great research site for us because of the access to urban green spaces," Townsend-Small says. "Now we're exploring whether you can reduce the amount of energy you need to make a lawn pretty and preserve the carbon storage in soils."

Townsend-Small's research could prove useful to cities, businesses and urban universities, such as UC, that are interested in reducing their . Her data offer an important warning to such groups: When measuring your carbon footprint, remember to thoroughly evaluate what's underfoot.

"Urban green space usually gets a lot of credit for all the benefits to the atmosphere," Townsend-Small says. "But most people don't consider the positive influxes of carbon dioxide from maintenance."

Explore further: Dead floppy drive: Kenya recycles global e-waste

More information: www.aag.org/cs/events/event_detail?eventId=375

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study Fumes Over City Park Grass

Jan 28, 2010

Plants are usually our allies when it comes to reducing the atmosphere's greenhouse gases, converting carbon dioxide into food and storing the gas' carbon in the soil below.

Nitrogen fertilizers' impact on lawn soils

Nov 04, 2011

Nitrogen fertilizers from farm fields often end up in aquatic ecosystems, resulting in water quality problems, such as toxic algae and underwater 'dead zones'. There are concerns that fertilizers used on lawns may also contribute ...

When the grass isn't always greener

Aug 09, 2012

Worries about Pennsylvania facing a severe drought seem to have faded with recent rainstorms, but the question of how to care for your lawn during this summer's heat is still important.

Recommended for you

Dead floppy drive: Kenya recycles global e-waste

12 hours ago

In an industrial area outside Kenya's capital city, workers in hard hats and white masks take shiny new power drills to computer parts. This assembly line is not assembling, though. It is dismantling some ...

New paper calls for more carbon capture and storage research

17 hours ago

Federal efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions must involve increased investment in research and development of carbon capture and storage technologies, according to a new paper published by the University of Wyoming's ...

Coal gas boom in China holds climate change risks

21 hours ago

Deep in the hilly grasslands of remote Inner Mongolia, twin smoke stacks rise more than 200 feet into the sky, their steam and sulfur billowing over herds of sheep and cattle. Both day and night, the rumble ...

User comments : 0