Senate chairman calls for 'Do Not Track' bill

Apr 24, 2013 by Anne Flaherty
In this Jan. 11, 2013 file photo, Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee Chairman Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va. speaks in Charleston, W.Va. Online privacy rules are changing. The question now is how much you'll care. Rockefeller planned a hearing Wednesday to press his proposal to subject companies to penalties by the Federal Trade Commission if they violate a consumer's "do not track" request. (AP Photo/Tyler Evert, File)

A top Senate Democrat says the advertising industry is ignoring consumers' requests not to be tracked online and that it's probably time for federal regulation.

Sen. Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia delivered the threat in his opening remarks at a congressional hearing Wednesday on his proposal to impose a "Do Not Track" list that companies would have to honor or face penalties by the .

Rockefeller, who chairs the , says he has long been skeptical of industry's ability to regulate itself when it directly affects profits. Lobbyists representing the online advertising industry say they believe their voluntary program is working and that industry mandates would be too onerous.

Explore further: Online privacy is evolving. Does it matter to you? (Update)

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